Resources – Search Results

These resources have been compiled by the Kindertransport Association as an effort to make it easier for students, researchers, Kindertransport generations, and all interested parties to locate Kindertransport materials available in print, film, and online. Use the search feature or browse by category. More history and stories about the Kindertransport can be found in our History and Voices sections.

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Kindertransport

(2008)

A collection of personal reminiscences and tributes from people who were rescued on the Kindertransport, collected by the Quakers in Great Britain in 2008.

Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued – Webinar

(2021) Published by Holocaust Museum Los Angeles

Nicky & Vera is a new book, by award-winning author-artist Peter Sís, that introduces the Holocaust to youngsters ages 6-9. The panel features Barbara Winton, the daughter of Sir Nicholas Winton; Peter Sís, author and illustrator; and Michele Gold, Museum Board Chair and the daughter of Rita Berwald who journeyed to safety on a Kindertransport out of Leipzig, Germany.

Züge ins Leben – Kindertransporte im 2. WK

by Jürgens, Uli (2016)

Ilse Melamid, Hans Menasse, Ari Rath und Dora Schimanko gehörten zu jenen Kindern, die 1938/39 mit so genannten Kindertransporten ins Ausland geschickt wurden, vor allem nach Großbritannien – organisiert von der Jüdischen Gemeinde und den Quäkern – oder auch mit Hilfe der Jugendalijah nach Palästina. Sie waren vor der Verfolgung durch die Nationalsozialisten in Sicherheit, wurden von wohltätigen Familien aufgenommen oder aber zu harter Arbeit verpflichtet. 45 min.

Wiener Library

Located in London is the world’s oldest Holocaust memorial institution. They have a large collection of Kindertransport materials.

War Story

by Edelman, Gwen (2001); Published by New York: Penguin Putnam

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Use this website’s search function to explore the museum’s many Kindertransport-related resources.

The Millisle Farm in Co Down

Published by Down County Museum

Jewish children, who escaped on Kindertransports, and other refugees from Nazi terror found refuge in a remote farm on the Ards peninsula in the late 1930s. The Belfast Jewish community had leased the farm to provide a home and living for these refugees. In Millisle and Donaghadee the local communities, including Millisle Primary School, proved to be firm friends of the farm, providing help with whatever was needed.

The Historical Association Alkmaar

(2018) Published by de Historische Vereniging Alkmaar

The Historical Association Alkmaar started in 2018 with a campaign to develop and fund a statue for Truus Wijsmuller-Meijer. The municipality of Alkmaar and the Historical Association Alkmaar worked together towards the day of the unveiling: April 21, 2020, the birthday of Truus Wijsmuller-Meijer. Given the coronavirus, this has unfortunately not happened. The Historical Association Alkmaar and the municipality of Alkmaar are currently discussing a new date for the unveiling of the statue. Information can be found on the website Tante Truus is here!

The Global Directory of Holocaust Museums

A directory with links to museums throughout the world.

The Girl Museum- Kindertransport

(2018) Published by Girl Museum

A lovely online resource, showcasing photographs, documents, and videotaped oral histories, with a robust study guide that meets common core educational goals.

The Ephraims and the Neumeyers

by Locke, Tim (2014)

Perspectives on family stories of Görlitz, Dachau, the Kindertransport and the Holocaust. Tim Locke, whose mother Ruth(nee Ruth Neumeyer) and uncle Raimund escaped Nazi Germany on a Kindertransport to England, investigates and shares his family history from the 18th century forward.

The End Of Everything Ever

by NIE Theatre (2008)

New International Encounter brings together theatre-makers from different European countries to tell stories that focus on episodes that have shaped recent history. Weaving together live music, physical action, and a multitude of languages, they devise visually driven performances that speak directly and dynamically to an audience. They have won awards for their work in both the UK and Europe. The End of Everything Ever draws on true stories and accounts of the Kindertransport to follow the journey of six year old Agata and her quest for home. A story of survival, love and hope.

The Children Who Cheated the Nazis: The Story of the Kindertransport

by Read, Sue (2000)

A documentary film that was broadcast on British television in 2002.

Testimony of the Human Spirit

by Robbins, Sarah Kate, and Zucker, Stanley (2004); Published by Westchester Holocaust Education Center

A group of four short documentary films that tell the history of the Holocaust from 1933 to 1945 through the eyes and words of six survivors. Interweaving the powerful personal accounts of these men and women who were children in Europe during the Holocaust, including KTA member Sel Hubert, the film documents their journeys from persecution through liberation to the shores of America, where they overcame horror and loss to create meaningful, productive lives. Created for use in schools.

Teaching “The Children of Willesden Lane”

Online resource for secondary school teachers. Includes classroom videos; a documentary profile of the author, pianist Mona Golabek; and a special performance where Mona retells her mother’s story, weaving in the piano music from the book. The website complements the book’s curriculum guide, created by Facing History and Ourselves.

Tante Truus ist hier!

by Spaans, Leen (2018); Published by Committee Statue for Truus Historical Society Alkmaar

The statue for Truus Wijsmuller is finished and is worthy in Alkmaar for placement and unveiling, that is to say: when the corona crisis is over. In principle, Tuesday, April 21, 2020 would have been the day of the unveiling. With a reception in the Grote Kerk, guests from home and abroad, some surviving children from 1938-1940, the sculptors Annet Terberg-Pompe and Lea Wijnhoven, and many others.

Sir Nicholas Winton

(2021) Published by The Sir Nicholas Winton Memorial Trust

This website features information and documentation on the life and work of Sir Nicholas Winton, who organized Kindertransports from Prague in the months before WWII. The exhibition page (https://www.nicholaswinton.com/exhibition) covers the whole of Sir Nicholas’ life as well as his Kindertransport work and showcases many documents, photographs and artifacts from the archive to illustrate his story.

Ruth, A Little Girl’s Big Journey

by Westheimer, Ruth (2020); Published by USC Shoah Foundation

An animated short film for primary school students follows Dr. Ruth’s Holocaust story of survival as a young girl to explore universal themes; fear, loss and lonliness, as well as resilience, bravery and hope.

Rosa’s Child, The True Story of One Woman’s Quest for a Lost Mother and a Vanished Past

by Bechhofer, Susie and Jeremy Josephs (1996); Published by London: I.B. Tauris

Robert and Eva

by Suchmann, Mike (2012)

KT3 Mike Suchmann has made this short film about his Grandparens, both Kindertransport Survivors, their childhoods, how they met, and their 62 year marriage.

Ralph and Suzanne Samuel StoryCorps

by Samuel, Ralph and Suzanne (2018)

Kindertransport Survivor Ralph Samuel shares his life history with his daughter.

Quaker Kindertransport histories

by Religious Society of Friends, UK (2008); Published by Quakers in Britain

Read histories of Kindertransportees helped by Quakers here. Quakers were involved at all stages in the Kindertransport. In London they joined with Jewish delegates in persuading the government to relax immigration requirements, making it easier to evacuate people from Nazi Europe. Quakers accompanied children on the long journey to safety and many families and Quaker schools provided homes.

Quaker honored among heroes of the Holocaust

by van Staveren, Anne (2008); Published by Religious Society of Friends

Britons who saved the lives of Jews and other persecuted groups during the Holocaust are being honoured for their actions. They include Quaker Bertha Bracey who lobbied the British government about the plight of Jews in Germany. She played a key role in setting up the Kindertransport which brought 10,000 mainly Jewish children to England from mainland Europe. This is the first time such recognition has been bestowed by the State as a tribute to those civilians who undertook extraordinary acts of courage and self sacrifice, in order to help others.

Project Jewish Life in Frankfurt

by Lieberz-Gross, Till and Rieber, Angelika (2012)

The focus of our work is to keep in memory the lives of former Jewish Frankfurt citizens and to learn and teach about present-day Jewish life.

Paul Heimann, A Kind from Vienna, speaks

by Heimann, Paul (2016); Published by Crestwood School

Paul Heimann was born in Austria in 1923. When the Anschluss took place, Paul and his parents found themselves at the centre of Hitler’s ambitions, and they felt the full weight of Nazism with the Kristallnacht. Their synagogue was burned, and the stormtroopers prevented the fire department from taking action. Paul’s parents saw the writing on the wall, and they arranged to have Paul evacuated, and Paul was fortunate to join the kindertransport. Paul was interviewed by a group of students at Baycrest in September 2016, where he shared his story, and even played a few tunes for them.

Nicky’s Family

by Minac, Matej (2011); Published by Minac, Matej and Pass, Patrik

Nicky’s Family tells the story of Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who organized the rescue of 669 Czech and Slovak children just before the outbreak of World War II.

My Knees Were Jumping: Remembering the Kindertransports

by Hacker, Melissa (1996); Published by Bee's Knees Productions

Award-winning documentary film directed by the daughter of a Kind from Vienna.

My Heart in a Suitcase

by Gunning, Greg (2006); Published by ArtsPower National Touring Theatre

Family theater production based on the life of Anne Fox.

Millisle, County Down – Haven from Nazi Terror

by Taylor, Marilyn (2001); Published by History Ireland

The story of the Refugee Resettlement Farm, which existed in Millisle, County Down from 1938 to 1948, is one of the little-known ‘secret histories’ of the Second World War in Ireland. To this remote, disused farm on the beautiful Ards peninsula, came, in the late 1930s, Jewish children who escaped on Kindertransports, together with older members of religious Zionist youth groups, and some adults, all refugees from Nazi terror.

Margaret Kahn interview

by Kahn, Margaret (2016); Published by Mercy Community

Margaret Kahn, née Jonas, tells her lifer story, from Kindertransport on December 1, 1938 to a teaching hospital in London, marriage and life in Connecticut. At 94, she still volunteers to speak with young students.

Letters From Children on the First Kindertransport

by Green, Jessica (2016); Published by European Holocaust Research Infrastructure Blog

A mapped series of transcribed letters written by children while in transit on the first Kindertransport on 1 December 1938. The letters are addressed to their families back in Germany while the children are leaving them behind for the safety of England. They were subsequently transcribed by an anonymous source and sent to the JCIO by somebody who identified himself as Herr Flörsheim (or Mr Flörsheim) from Amsterdam. Beyond those few details, nothing is known about the specific provenance of this item or the individual children who wrote the letters themselves.

Leo Baeck Institute Kindertransport Resources

(2019) Published by Leo Baeck Institute

In honor of their exhibit “Kindertransport: Rescuing Children on the Brink of War” Leo Baeck put some of their Kindertransport related documents online.

Leo Baeck Institute

The Leo Baeck Institute for the study of the history and culture of German-speaking Jewry. This research, exhibition, and lecture institute has significant archival materials on the Kindertransport.

Last Train to Tomorrow: The Kindertransport Movement 1938-1939

by Davis, Carl and Oram, Hiawyn (2011); Published by Faber Music Ltd.

A musical tribute to the Kindertransport for children’s choir, actors and orchestra.

Kitchener Camp Refugees to Britain in 1939

by Weissenberg, Clare (2017)

The aim of this website is to gather together Kitchener camp documents, letters, photographs, and histories. We hope to create a better understanding: of how the Kitchener men escaped from Germany, Austria, Poland, and Czechoslovakia in 1939 of what their lives and routines were like in Kitchener camp and of what they went on to do when the camp closed down.

Kindertransports from North Rhine-Westphalia

by Lissner, Cordula, Reuter, Ursula, Stellmacher, Adrian (2016); Published by Kindertransport Project Group of the Yavneh Memorial and Educational Centre

The Project ‘Kindertransports from North Rhine-Westphalia’ had the aim of putting together the full story of the Kindertransport from the Rhineland and Westphalia, about which up until now only fragments had been known, and making the results available to the memorial centres in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, especially their educational departments.

Kindertransport: Tylers Green Hostel for young Jewish Refugees

by Koschland, Bernard (2007); Published by Jewish Historical Society of England

This article in the journal Jewish Historical Studies: Transactions, Volume 41, describes two wartime hostels for young refugees who arrived in Britain under the auspices of the Refugee Children’s Movement. Clearly written, it provides details of the daily life and problems (budgets,etc) of the kind of hostels to which Kinder were sent.

Kindertransport: Terror, Trauma and Triumph

by Sharples, Carolyn (2004); Published by History Today Magazine

Caroline Sharples discusses the bitter-sweet experiences of the Jewish children permitted to travel to England to escape the Nazi regime, leaving their families behind them.

Kindertransport: Memory, Identity and the British-Jewish Diaspora

by Neumeier, Beate (2003); Published by Rodopi

This chapter in the book “Diaspora and Multiculturalism: Common Traditions and New Developments” provides a comparative and insightful analysis of Lore Segal’s personal account “Other People’s Houses;” Diane Samuel’s stage play “Kindertransport,” and the documentary film “Into the Arms of Strangers.”

Kindertransport: Britain’s rescue plan

by Kaczmarska, Ela (2010); Published by National Archives

The Wiener Library holds many personal accounts of children evacuated from Nazi Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia between December 1938 and September 1939. Using individual first-hand accounts sourced from The Wiener Library and documents held at The National Archives, this talk gives insights into how Britain dealt with the refugee children who arrived on the Kindertransports and the difficulties they faced.

KIndertransport Teaching Resources, British National Archives

Published by British National Archives

A collection of Kindertransport related documents, downloadable for classroom use.

Kindertransport Photographs

by Arbuckle, Alex Q.

A webpage of an introduction to the Kindertransport history and photographs of Kinder arriving and at Dovercourt.

KIndertransport Museum in Vienna

(2014) Published by Milli Segal

“Für das Kind” is dedicated to all who helped ten thousand – mostly Jewish – children in Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland to escape and to survive the Nazi machinery of death between 1938 and 1939. The first Kindertransport from Vienna left on 10 December 1938 going from Westbahnhof to London, the last one on 22 August 1939. Visits by appointment.

Kindertransport Memory Quilt

by Grosz, Hanus, Kirsten Grosz and Anita Grosz (2000); Published by The Kindertransport Association

Beautiful photographs of the Kindertransport Memory Quilt panels combined with the moving stories behind each square. Can be purchased through the Holocaust Memorial Center, 28123 Orchard Lake Road, Farmington Hills, MI.

Kindertransport Library of the Religious Society of Friends in Britain

In 1933 Meeting for Sufferings (the executive body of the Society of Friends) set up the Germany Emergency Committee (GEC), later renamed the Friends Committee for Refugees and Aliens (FCRA), in response to anti-Jewish laws of the new Nazi regime. This is a list of Kindertransport research resources.

Kindertransport Journey: Memory into History

by Robert Sugar

Exhibition by Robert Sugar Showings include:

  • Temple Am Shalom (Glencoe, IL): April 2007
  • Central College Drama Department (Pella, IA): Winter 2007
  • Florida Atlantic University: April 2006
  • The New Mexico Holocaust and Intolerance Museum and Study Center: Fall 2006.

Kindertransport Association Oral History Project Interviews

by Hacker, Grosz, Kollisch

A selection of the interviews conducted by the KTA Oral History Project. Interviewers were all KT2. Interviews done at reunions in the early 1990’s. Placed online by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Interviews and transcripts are also at the Holocaust Memorial Center, Farmington Hills, Michigan & the Wienner Library, London.

Judaic Academic and Library Links

A list of links compiled by the University of Pennsylvania Library.

Jewish Wikipedia: Kindertransport

by White, Jack (2017)

This website includes articles on various aspects of Kindertransport history, and links to many short videos.

Israel Uncensored: Remembering the Holocaust – From Home

by Hasten, Josh (2020); Published by Sound Cloud, The Land of Israel Network

In the age of Corona, this year’s annual Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Day in Israel will be commemorated at home through technology. To discuss this reality and to share his story of survival with Josh Hasten, is Walter Bingham, who at 96, is the world’s oldest radio talk-show host. Hear how he survived Kristallnacht as a young teen, and was fortunate to make it to England on a Kindertransport. Bingham eventually made Aliyah where he continues to this day, his career in journalism. Don’t miss the interview with Bingham – a truly inspiring Jewish treasure and hero.

Interview with Sir Nicholas Winton

by Simon, Bob (2014); Published by 60 Minutes, CBS News

In honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, 60 Minutes looks back at Bob Simon’s 2014 profile of Sir Nicholas Winton, who saved 669 children from the Nazis. Video and transcript.

Interview with Holocaust Survivor Ester Golan, Survivor and Kindertransport Child

by Berman, Kathryn (2012); Published by Yad Vashem

My family had wanted to leave Germany together, but unfortunately we could not get a family visa. My parents wanted to leave Germany for Palestine. My mother was a Zionist, but they didn’t have enough money to leave… By saving her family, my mother ensured the continuation of her family. Only my parents were left in Berlin. In October 1942, they were sent to Theresienstadt, where my father perished in 1943.

Imperial War Museum

This museum in London has a collection of documents relating to the Kindertransport.

Ilse and Molly Camis StoryCorps

by Camis, Ilse and Molly (2015); Published by StoryCorps

Kindertransport survivor Ilse Camis speaks with daughter Molly Camis at the 2015 Kindertransport Association conference.

Holocaust Memorial Day Trust

The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, based in London, has an online archive of articles about the Kindertransports.

Holocaust Memorial Center

Located in Michigan, the Holocaust Memorial Center’s collection includes the three Kindertransport Memory Quilts, made with memorial squares contributed by members of the Kindertransport Association.

Holocaust Day: A Haven in Wales

(2005) Published by BBC 2 Wales

This documentary, broadcast on BBC 2 Wales on Holocaust Day 2005, features the reminiscences of some of the 200 Kindertransport children who found a haven at Gwrych Castle in North East Wales.

Holocaust & the Kindertransport: Vera

by Gissing, Vera (2007); Published by Teachers TV

A 5 minute video of Vera Gissing, a Kind from Czechoslovakia, remembering her Kindertransport experience and reuniting with an old friend.

Hebrew University Jerusalem Holocaust Oral Histories

The 1,400 Holocaust audio interviews and transcripts reflect the vast scope of oral histories collected by researchers which have been archived at the Oral History Division of the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. They include interviews conducted in the early 1960s. The collection developed over the past 60 years as more research was undertaken by established and emerging scholars and questions relating to the experience of Jews under Nazism broadened. This resource should provide an invaluable tool for researchers in Holocaust studies.

Girl Museum madchen des kindertransport

by Rosborough, Kelsey

Girl Museum is the first museum in the world dedicated to girlhood. We are a virtual museum for exhibitions, education, and raising awareness about girls and girlhood globally. We are also an information platform for social/cultural dialogue and investigation. We research and collect cross-cultural historic and contemporary images and stories from and about girlhood around the world. Through exhibitions, publications, and projects, we explore and document the unique experience of being born and growing up female.

German and Austrian War Children In The Netherlands

by Keesing, Miriam (2013); Published by DOKIN

Dokin is a Dutch acronym for Duitse Oorlogskinderen In Nederland (German War Children in the Netherlands). Here you will find information about the refugee children from the Third Reich who came to the Netherlands after Kristallnacht. There were almost 2000 children that came to the Netherlands. On this website you will find information on these children and about this period in Dutch history.

Gerettet Berichte von Kindertransport und Auswanderung nach Großbritannien

by Thune, Eva-Marie (2019); Published by Hentrich und Hentrich Verlag

Eva-Maria Thüne visited 36 Kindertransport ‘children’ and held talks with them in 2017-2018. The main concern of the linguist was to gain knowledge about the attitudes of the rescued towards the German and the acquisition of the English language. As a study on the language of migrants, von Thüne’s investigation includes questions about language change, linguistic and cultural affiliation and identity. Her website includes links to the interviews.

Exploring 20th Century London: Kindertransports

A British overview of the Kindertransport, with links to documents pertaining to Kind Grete Glauber, who later took on the surname of her adoptive mother, Quaker schoolteacher Olive Rudkin.

Escape From the Holocaust 1939

by Moratz, Ralph (2015)

Ralph Moratz writes of his childhood journey from Berlin, via Kindertransport to France, and in September 1941 to New York. One of his childhood companions was concert promoter Bill Graham.

Dokin: German and Austrian War Children In The Netherlands

by Keesing, Miriam (2014); Published by Duitse Oorlogskinderen In Nederland

Dokin is a Dutch acronym for Duitse Oorlogskinderen In Nederland (German War Children in the Netherlands). Here you will find information about the refugee children from the Third Reich who came to the Netherlands after Kristallnacht. Almost 2000 children came to the Netherlands between November 1938 and September 1939.

Dig World War 2: The Millisle Farm Story

by Snow, Dan and Litvack, Leon (2013); Published by BBC One Television

Dan Snow interviews Leon Litvack about the Millisle Farm Project.

British Library Jewish Survivors of the Holocaust

These recordings are powerful personal accounts of the Holocaust from Jewish survivors living in Britain. The interviews were selected from a much larger oral history project, the Living Memory of the Jewish Community, which recorded testimony between 1988-2000. The project was developed with the specialist advice of leading Jewish historians and complements a number of collections held by the Sound Archive on Jewish life in Britain.

BBC Teach: WWII, Nicholas Winton

(2020) Published by BBC

In 1938, Nicholas Winton was a young stockbroker in London. He was keenly aware of the events unfolding on the continent. Jews were under threat in Nazi-occupied Europe. Anti-Semitism was established in law and violence against Jewish buildings and businesses was increasing. It was clear to many that worse would follow.

BBC History Online

By typing “Kindertransport” in the search field, you will access all programs relating to the Kindertransport aired on BBC television, radio and websites.

Ballyrolly House, Millisle, Co. Down

Published by WartimeNI

Ballyrolly House stood in 70 acres of land in Millisle, Co. Down. The Belfast Jewish Community saw to it that the farm would house Kindertransport refugees.

Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR): Kindertransport

The official web home of the British Kinder.

Association of Holocaust Organizations

An international network for the advancement of Holocaust education, remembrance and research.

Anne Frank Guide: The Kindertransport

This student-oriented web page offers an overview of the Kindertransport as well as a profile of Nicholas Winton and a link to an article about Kind Alfred Batzdorff.

American Jewish History

by Zucker, Bat-Ami (2001); Published by Frances Perkins and the German-Jewish Refugees, 1933-1940 (Vol. 89, No. 1)

All My Loved Ones

by Minac, Matej (1999)

A feature film that focuses on a family in dramatizing the story of the Kindertransports from Prague.

Admission of German Refugee Children.” U.S. Congress, House Committee on Immigration and Naturalization, 76th Congress, First Session, 1939

(1939) Published by U.S. Congress, House Committee on Immigration

Abschied ein Leben Lang- A Life-Long Farewell

by Kratz, Kathe (1999); Published by Extrafilm

Three former residents of Vienna, KTA member Anne (Anny) Kelemen, Gerda Lederer and Curtis Brown (Kurt Braun), return to Vienna, the city where they were born. They are invited by the ‘Lost Neighborhood’ memorial project, part of which is the reconstruction of the façade of a synagogue destroyed 60 years ago. The stories told by these three emigrants are juxtaposed with images of this project, resulting in a dramatic, humorous and moving documentary of Jewish life in 1930s Vienna.

A Thousand Kisses Stories of the Kindertransport

by Weiner Library (2018); Published by Harwich Haven: Surrender and Sanctuary

This exhibition tells the story of the Kindertransports through the experiences of eight children and the loved ones they left behind, whose documents, letters and memoirs are amongst those held in the Wiener Library Collections. It is a story of persecution, migration, of refugees who were made welcome and those who were turned away.

Whitehall and the Jews, 1933-1948: British Immigration Policy, Jewish Refugees and the Holocaust

by London, Louise (2000); Published by Cambridge University Press

Where She Came From: A Daughter’s Search for Her Mother’s History

by Epstein, Helen (1997); Published by Boston: Little, Brown

A memoir of the lives of Epstein’s mother, grandmother, and great grandmother. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

When Time Ran Out: Coming of Age in the Third Reich

by Zeller, Frederic (1989); Published by Sag Harbor, New York: Permanent Press

Frederic Zeller’s story of his childhood in Berlin and escape to Holland, where he joined a Kindertransport. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

What Happened to the Children Who Fled Nazi Persecution?

by Sonnert, Gerhard and Holton, Gerald (2006); Published by New York, Palgrave Macmillan

This book aims to create a collective biography of Jewish young people who were born in Germany or Austria between 1918 and 1935 and fled to the United States. It endeavors to present a statistical picture as well as to capture personal experiences based on a five-year, in-depth study. One of the book’s aims is to provide readers with information to influence the view of immigrant newcomers in the United States today.

We Were Children Just Like You

by Eliach, Yaffa (1990); Published by Brooklyn, NY: Center for Holocaust Studies and Documentation

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

We Had to Be Brave: Escaping the Nazis on the Kindertransport

by Hopkinson, Deborah (2020); Published by Scholastic Focus

Ruth David was growing up in a small village in Germany when Adolf Hitler rose to power in the 1930s. Under the Nazi Party, Jewish families like Ruth’s experienced rising anti-Semitic restrictions and attacks. Just going to school became dangerous. By November 1938, anti-Semitism erupted into Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, and unleashed a wave of violence and arrests.

We Came as Children: A Collective Autobiography

by Gershon, Karen (1966); Published by New York: Harcourt Brace and World

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Vienna and Its Jews: The Tragedy of Success: 1880s – 1980s

by Berkley, George E. (1988); Published by Lanham, Maryland: Madison Books

Vielleicht Habe Ich Glueck Gehabt

by Kratz, Käthe (2002)

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Verfolgung, Flucht, Rettung (Persecution, Flight, Rescue): Die Kindertransportet 1938/39 nach Grossbritannien

by Curio, Claudia (2006); Published by The Zentrum fuer Antisemitismusforschung of the Technische Universitaet Berlin

In this book, her doctoral dissertation, Claudia Curio delves into the question of why for so long pre-WWII emigration studies tended to overlook the Kindertransport experience in contrast to the attention given to the Youth Alijah. Through use of well documented case studies and extensive analysis Curio provides raises many issues of intimate concern to Kinder, and which, as she skillfully shows, had lasting influence on their lives. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Uprooted and Replanted: The Memoir of Helmut Heckscher from Hamburg to the Kindertransport to America

by Heckscher, Helmut (2017); Published by Xlibris

n this lively memoir, Helmut shares his experiences and adventures, starting with his childhood growing up as a Jew in Nazi Germany and his escape to the UK with the Kindertransport. He writes of working in a factory in England, his interment at the start of World War II, and nights in the subways of London during the Blitz. Helmut eventually reunited with his parents in Wisconsin, then was drafted into the Army. With a lively voice, Helmut tells the story of his remarkable life, and paints a picture of a refugee becoming an American in the 20th Century.

Unfulfilled Promise – Rescue and Resettlement of Jewish Refugee Children in the United States 1934-1935

by Baumel, Judith Tydor (1990); Published by Juneau, AK: Denali Press

A scholarly book by the author of two theses on the Kindertransport movement. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Turning the Key

by Kramer, Lotte (2009); Published by Rockingham Press

Lotte Kramer has been described as a “Holocaust poet” and it is true that she writes feelingly about the family and friends she left behind when she came to Britain in 1939 in the Kindertransport. But her canvas is much broader. She writes about the landscapes of modern Europe, about the Fen Country where she now lives and about paintings and literature. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center

Trauma and Attachment in the Kindertransport Context: German-Jewish Child Refugees’ Accounts of Displacement and Acculturation in Great Britain

by Guske, Iris (2009); Published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing

The present volume is the result of an interdisciplinary oral history research project, which was carried out at the Centre for German-Jewish Studies at the University of Sussex. While each Holocaust survivor’s developmental story is unique, it is, however, linked to the others’ by the common experience of negotiating an identity between two countries, cultures, and religions against the background of unparalleled political upheavals, and as such also sheds light on, and offers ways out of, the traumata suffered in present-day contexts of enforced migration and displacement.

Total Recall

by Paretsky, Sara (2001); Published by New York: Delacorte Press

Too Young to Remember

by Heifetz, Julie (1989); Published by Detroit: Wayne State University Press

Julie Heifetz’s collection of interviews with child Holocaust survivors. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Time Zones: A Journalist in the World

by Schlesinger, Joe (1990); Published by Toronto: Random House Canada

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Throw Your Feet Over Your Shoulders: Beyond the Kindertransport

by Stolzberg Korobkin, Frieda (2008); Published by Devora Publishing

In Throw Your Feet Over Your Shoulders: Beyond the Kindertransport, Frieda Stolzberg Korobkin presents a compelling, powerful and vividly described odyssey of her life as a six-year- old child sent by her parents (along with her siblings) from their home in Vienna, Austria to the relative safety of England. It is December 1938, and Friedl’s parents make the heart-wrenching decision to send her and her sisters and brother on a kindertransport to England — organized by Rabbi Solomon Schonfeld.

Three Lives in Transit

by Selo, Laura (1992); Published by London: Excalibur Press

The autobiographical story of three sisters who traveled from Prague to London.

They Found Refuge

by Bentwich, Norman (1956); Published by London: Cresset Press

Norman Bentwich writes of his involvement with the Kindertransport movement.

The Uprooted: A Hitler Legacy: Voices of Those Who Escaped Before the “Final Solution.”

by Whiteman, Dorit Bader (1993); Published by New York: Insight Books

Dorit Bader Whiteman has woven together the stories of 190 escapees, including several who left via the Kindertransports.

The Tiger in the Attic: Memories of the Kindertransport and Growing Up English

by Milton, Edith (2005); Published by Chicago: University of Chicago Press

The Star and the Shamrock

by Grainger, Jean (2019); Published by Independently Published

Could you put your children on a train to save their lives? Ariella Bannon is alone except for her two Jewish children. With every passing day, life is becoming more and more dangerous for Liesl and Erich in Berlin. The Nazis are allowing some children out on the Kindertransport, but can she bear to let them go? Amazon bestsellers, The Star and the Shamrock, and its sequel The Emerald Horizon are stories of the darkest days in human history, but amid the terror is the indominable human spirit, and the incredible kindness of strangers.

The Salzburg Connection: An Adolescence Remembered

by Lieberman, J. Nina (2004); Published by New York: Vantage Press

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Rescue of the Prague Refugees: 1938/39

by Chadwick, W.R. (2010); Published by Matador

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Phantom Lane

by Kramer, Lotte (2000); Published by Ware, England: The Rockingham Press

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The One I Was

by Graham, Eliza (2015); Published by Lake Union Publishing - Amazon

The Ninth of November

by Zurndorfer, Hannele (1983); Published by London: Quartet Books

Hannele Zurndorfer left Dusseldorf in May 1939 on a children’s transport with her younger sister. She ends her story with the last letter she received from her father. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Nature of Blood

by Phillips, Caryl (1997); Published by New York: Alfred A. Knopf

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Latecomers

by Brookner, Anita (1989); Published by New York: Pantheon Books

The Last Train to London

by Waite Clayton, Meg (2019); Published by Harper Books

From New York Times bestselling novelist Meg Waite Clayton comes a powerful pre-WWII era novel based on the true story of the Kindertransport rescue of ten thousand children from Nazi-occupied Europe – and one brave woman, Truus Wijsmuller, who helped them escape.

The King’s Most Loyal Enemy Aliens: Germans Who Fought for Britain in the Second World War

by Fry, Helen (2007); Published by Sutton Publishing

This book tells the compelling story of the 10,000 German and Austrian nationals who, fleeing Nazi persecution, arrived in Britain between 1933 and 1939, and at the outbreak of war on 3 September 1939 became ‘enemy aliens’. Many volunteered to serve in the British forces, swore allegiance to George VI and became known as ‘the King’s most loyal enemy aliens’. Interviews with several KTA members are featured, as well as an impressive selection of archive photographs, many of which are reproduced for the first time. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Kindertransport, Contesting Memory

by Craig-Norton, Jennifer (2019); Published by Indiana University Press

Jennifer Craig-Norton sets out to challenge celebratory narratives of the Kindertransport that have dominated popular memory and literature. According to these accounts, the Kindertransport was a straightforward act of rescue and salvation, with little room for a deeper, more complex analysis. Craig-Norton emphasizes the use of archival sources, many of them newly discovered testimonial accounts and letters. This evidence allows compelling insights into interactions between children and parents and caregivers and shows readers a more nuanced and complete picture of the Kindertransport.

The Kindertransport Experience; A Socio-Psychological Study of Attachment, Trauma And Acculturation

by Guske, Iris, Dr (2007); Published by Centre for German Jewish Studies, University of Sussex

Unpublished doctoral thesis featuring several members of the KTA.

The Heart Has Reasons: Holocaust Rescuers and Their Stories of Courage

by Klempner, Mark (2006); Published by Cleveland, Ohio: Pilgrim Press

The Girl with Two Suitcases

by Baram, Myra (1988); Published by Sussex, England: The Book Guild

Kindertransport Survivor Myra Baram tells the story of her life from Berlin to Nethanya, Israel. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Fortunate Ones

by Umansky, Ellen (2017); Published by William Morrow

One very special work of art – a Chaim Soutine painting – will connect the lives and fates of two different women, generations apart, in this enthralling and transporting debut novel that moves from World War II Vienna to contemporary Los Angeles. It is 1939 in Vienna, and as the specter of war darkens Europe, Rose Zimmer’s parents are desperate. Unable to get out of Austria, they manage to secure passage for their young daughter on a kindertransport, and send her to live with strangers in England.

The Forgotten Kindertransportees: The Scottish Experience

by Williams, Frances (2014); Published by Bloomsbury Academic

Introduction: The Forgotten Kindertransportees: A Scottish Experience 1. Protecting the Status Quo: The Reception of the Trans-migrants 2. The Making of an Invisible Trans-migrant: Kindertransportee Care 3. Scottish Care for the Jewish Minor: Kindertransportees’ Adaptation to a New Jewish Life 4. Creating New Olim in Scotland: The Limitations of a Zionist Endeavour 5. Narrating Life Stories: The Long-term Impact of a Residential Upbringing 6. Imagining Scotland: The Scottish Legacy after Migration Appendices Glossary Bibliography Index. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center

The English German Girl

by Simons, Jake Wallis (2011); Published by Polygon: An Imprint of Birlinn Limited

‘Rosa must carry her suitcase herself. She heaves it up, walks through the doorway, looks back one final time: Papa and Mama are standing arm in arm, they are waving, but their masks have fallen away, they look hopeless, and that is the worst thing of all; Rosa turns her back and they are gone.” The Klein family is slowly but surely losing everything they hold dear or ever took for granted as Hitler’s anti-Jewish laws take hold in 1930s Berlin. In desperation, fifteen-year-old Rosa is put on a Kindertransport train out of Germany, to begin a new life in England.

The Emerald Horizon (The Star and the Shamrock Book 2)

by Grainger, Jean (2019); Published by Independently Published

Liesl and Erich have found a home in Ireland away from the chaos of war-ravaged Europe. As the dark news of what has happened to their fellow Jews filters through, they are torn – love for their mother and their home on one hand, and the profound sense of peace and belonging they have in Ballycreggan on the other. Like all of the other children who escaped Nazi territory on the Kindertransport, they must wait to hear the fate of their loved ones.

The Children’s Train, Escape On The Kindertransport

by Zinser, Jana (2015); Published by BQB Publishing

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Children We Remember

by Abells, Chana Byers (1987); Published by London: Julia MacRae Books

For 4 – 8 year olds, about children during the Holocaust. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Children of Willesden Lane. Beyond the Kindertransport: A Memoir of Music, Love, and Survival

by Golabek, Mona and Lee Cohen (2003); Published by New York: Warner Books

Aspiring pianist Lisa Jura was 14 when her family put her on a Kindertransport train in Vienna. Jura’s daughter, a pianist, traces the six years Jura spent in London, where she found a surrogate family in the 31 other young refugees at the Willesden Lane hostel.

The Boy in the Statue: From Wartime Vienna to Buckingham Palace

by Reich, Erich (2017); Published by i2i Publishing

The true story of a Jewish refugee boy, Erich, who arrived in this country from Nazi-occupied Europe three days before the start of the war. He was just four, and would never see his parents again. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Boy Alone in Nazi Vienna

(2018) Published by The Wiener Library for the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide

A cache of 40 letters discovered recently in a UK loft and digitized for The Wiener Library archive, documents the prelude to this more unusual experience from a child’s perspective. The letters were written by a boy in Vienna to his mother, who was already in the UK, over the course of an agonizing four-month separation. During this time each worked frantically towards a reunion that they could not be certain would happen as war clouds gathered. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Berlin Shadow

by Lichtenstein, Jonathan (2020); Published by Scribnner UK

A formally audacious and deeply moving memoir in three timeframes that confronts the defining trauma of the twentieth century, and its effects on a father and son. In 1939, Jonathan Lichtenstein’s father Hans escaped Nazi-occupied Berlin as a child refugee on the Kindertransport. Almost every member of his family died after Kristallnacht, and, arriving in England to make his way in the world alone, Hans turned his back on his German Jewish culture.

The Battle of Britishness: Migrant Journeys, 1685 to the Present

by Kushner, Tony (2012); Published by Manchester University Press

The Arrival of Jewish Refugee Children in England 1938-39

by Ford, Mary R (Volume 2, Number 2, 1983); Published by Immigrants & Minorities Journal, Routledge

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

The Ambiguity of Virtue: Gertrude Van Tijn and the Fate of the Dutch Jews

by Wasserstein, Bernard (2014); Published by Harvard University Press

A moving account of courage and of all-too-human failings in the face of extraordinary moral challenges, The Ambiguity of Virtue tells the story of Van Tijn’s work on behalf of her fellow Jews as the avenues that might save them were closed off. Between 1933 and 1940 Van Tijn helped organize Jewish emigration from Germany. After the Germans occupied Holland, she worked for the Nazi-appointed Jewish Council in Amsterdam and enabled many Jews to escape. Some later called her a heroine for the choices she made; others denounced her as a collaborator.

The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust, 1941-1945

by Wyman, David S. (1984); Published by New York: Pantheon Books

The 10,000 Children That Hitler Missed: Stories From The Kindertransport

by Greschler, Lori (2009); Published by BookSurge Publishing

Ten Thousand Children: True Stories Told by Children Who Escaped the Holocaust on the Kindertransport

by Fox, Anne L. and Eva Abraham-Podietz (1998); Published by Springfield, New Jersey: Behrman House

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Tell Everybody, Tell Everything: The Story of My Family & My Journey

by Rice, Gunther (2014); Published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing

“Part memoir, part biography, this story recounts the trials and tribulations of Gunther Rice (born Gunther Zloczower), the youngest of nine children raised in a Polish Jewish family in Hamburg, Germany. At age 14, he was deported with his family (and other Polish Jews) to Poland and for months lived as a refugee in the no-man’s land between Germany and Poland. He was rescued by the Kindertransport and brought to Cardiff, Wales, three days before the start of World War II. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Tehran Children: A Holocaust Refugee Odyssey

by Dekel, Mikhal (2019); Published by W. W. Norton & Company

Beginning with the death of the inscrutable Tehran Child who was her father, Dekel fuses memoir with extensive archival research to recover this astonishing story, with the help of travel companions and interlocutors including an Iranian colleague, a Polish PiS politician, a Russian oligarch, and an Uzbek descendent of Korean deportees. With literary grace, Tehran Children presents a unique narrative of the Holocaust, whose focus is not the concentration camp, but the refugee, and whose center is not Europe, but Central Asia and the Middle East.

Sunday’s Child? A Memoir

by Brent, Leslie Baruch (2009); Published by Bank House Books

“Professor Leslie Baruch Brent (known in the scientific world as Leslie Brent) arrived in England late in 1938 in the first of the many Kindertransports. His German-Jewish family was among millions who were murdered by the Nazi regime. In 1943, at the tender age of eighteen, he volunteered for the armed forces. Having studied zoology at the University of Birmingham he became an eminent immunologist in the field of tissue and organ transplantation. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Still Here: Inspiration From Survivors & Liberators of the Holocaust

by Marcus, Brian and Hersh, June (2016); Published by Itasca Books

The book melds portraits of Holocaust Survivors, including several Kindertransport Survivors, with meaningful quotes to create a living legacy that both honors and informs. Their portraits reveal insight into who they are and their quotes speak volumes of how they feel the world should be. Browse the online gallery of portraits, draw strength from the quotes and join in the conversation by sharing your own family’s story. Profits from the sale of Still Here will go to charities supporting Holocaust education.

Still Alive: A Holocaust Girlhood Remembered

by Segal, Lore and Kluger, Ruth (2003); Published by Feminist Press

Stunning contemplation of human relationships, power, and the creation of history through the prism of one woman’s Holocaust survival… Kluger dives in and out of her narrative to consider such topics as her imperfect relationship with her family, her creation of herself as a social being, and the encounters and relationships she’s had with Germans since the war… A work of such nuance, intelligence, and force that it leaps the bounds of genre. – Kirkus

Stella, One Woman’s True Tale of Evil, Betrayal, and Survival in Hitler’s Germany

by Wyden, Peter (1992); Published by Simon and Schuster

The story of Stella Goldschlag, whom Wyden knew as a child, when both were students at the Goldschmidt School in Berlin, and who later became notorious as a “catcher” in wartime Berlin, hunting hidden Jews for the Nazis. A compelling, moving and harrowing chronicle of Stella’s agonizing choice, her three murder trials, her reclusive existence, and the trauma inherited by her daughter in Israel.

Solomon Schonfeld: His Page in History

by Kranzler, David and Gertrude Hirschler, eds. (1982); Published by New York: Judaica Press

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Six from Leipzig: Kindertransport and the Cambridge Refugee Children’s Committee

by Dubrovsky, Gertrude (2003); Published by Vallentine Mitchell & Co Ltd

Six cousins from Leipzig, aged 7 months to 14 years, were among the 2,000 Kindertransport children who arrived in Cambridge. The story of these children brings to life the issues faced by all who travelled on the Kindertransports. Six from Leipzig puts the subject into historical perspective and will be invaluable to those who want to know how rescue was organized, by whom, and under what circumstances. It also emphasizes the role played by women in the rescue of these children, and in running refugee children’s committees; a fact that has not received the attention that it deserves.

Sisterland

by Newberry, Linda (2003); Published by Random House

There are two time frames in this novel for young adults that deals with issues of ethnicity, otherness and prejudice. In contemporary Northampton we find Hilly and her friends and family. Her grandmother, Heidigran, suffers from Alzheimer’s. The second time frame – before, during and immediately after the second world war, follows young Sarah Reubens, who is sent from Cologne on the Kindertransport to safety in Northampton. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Shofar: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Jewish Studies

by Benz, Wolfgang, Claudia Curio and Andrea Hummel, eds (Fall 2004); Published by Kindertransporte 1938/39 - Rescue and Integration. Special Issue 23, no. 1

This entire issue is dedicated to “Kindertransporte 1938/39 – Rescue and Integration”. The table of contents is available here. Online access to the articles requires a login account to Project MUSE.

Shefford: The Story of a Jewish School Community in Evacuation 1939-1945

by Grunfeld, Judith (1980); Published by London: Soncino Press

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Shedding Skins

by Wolff, Marion (2004); Published by San Luis Obispo, California: Central Coast Press

Through short memoirs, essays, and poetry, “Marion Wolff takes us through her fascinating life from childhood in Nazi Germany to the crazy, complicated life of retirement” (cover of book).

https://www.abebooks.com/9781930401273/Shedding-Skins-Marion-Wolff-1930401272/plp

Shakespeare’s Kitchen: Stories

by Segal, Lore (2007); Published by New Press

What began as seven interrelated short stories published in The New Yorker is now a full-length collection of thirteen stories featuring Austrian Kind Ilka Weisz, who accepts a position at a think tank called the Concordance Institute, and her struggle to form a new family out of friends and coworkers. Shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize.

Selected Poems

by Gershon, Karen (1966); Published by New York: Harcourt Brace and World

Poetry by a Kind who left Germany at the age of 15. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Searching for Fritzi

by Bergman, Carol (1999); Published by New York: Mediacs

This memoir traces the journey of three American women – a Jewish Holocaust survivor, her daughter, and her granddaughter – in search of their family’s history. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Saving Hanno: The Story of a Refugee Dog

by Halahmy, Miriam (2019); Published by Holiday House

What if you had to leave your dog behind when you fled? Nine-year-old Rudi has a chance to leave the dangers of Nazi Germany on a Kindertransport to England. However, he cannot bring Hanno, his dachshund. Luckily, his family finds a way to smuggle Hanno to London. But with England on the brink of war, Hanno is still not safe.

Salt of the Earth: An intergenerational journey of a family’s life, heartbreak and triumph before, during and after the Holocaust

by Pfeffer Vignola, Janet & Pfeffer Pfaff, Margaret; Published by CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

An intergenerational journey of a family’s life, heartbreak and triumph before, during and after the Holocaust. Written by two KT2s.

Runaway Waltz, A Memoir from Vienna to New York

by Morton, Frederic (2010); Published by Simon and Schuster

One of the most revered essayists and novelists of his generation, Frederic Morton has captured with matchless immediacy the glamour of Vienna before World War I in his bestselling and award-winning works. Now, in his first book in more than fifteen years, he delivers a luminous look at his own unique pursuit of the American dream. Like many Austrian boys in 1936, the author idolizes Fritz Austerlitz, the Austrian American who went to Hollywood and emerged as Fred Astaire. When his family is forced to flee Vienna, Fritz Mandelbaum becomes Fred Morton and immigrates to New York City. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Rosa’s Child, The True Story of One Woman’s Quest for a Lost Mother and a Vanished Past

by Bechhofer, Susie and Jeremy Josephs (1996); Published by London: I.B. Tauris

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Rettet wenigstens die Kinder Kindertransporte aus Frankfurt am Main – Lebenswege von geretteten Kindern

by Rieber, Angelika and Lieberz-Gross, Till (2019); Published by Fachhochschulverlag

Seven authors have collaborated with the project Jewish Life in Frankfurt am Main to research and compile biographies of children transport children. These life stories vividly show how the National Socialist policies affect life of the children and how the forced escape from Germany and the most final Separation of relatives shaped their lives.

Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport

by Hodge, Deborah (2012); Published by Tundra Books

This book, for children aged 10 and older, includes a compilation of accounts of Kindertransport children and is illustrated with archival photographs, paintings by artist Hans Jackson, and quilt squares created by the Kinder commemorating their rescue.

Rescue Operation for Jewish Children from Nazi Germany. the Kindertransporte of 1938-1939

by Muller-Knospe, Bernd (2017); Published by Grin Publishing

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Remembering Refugees: Then and Now

by Kushner, Tony (2006); Published by Manchester University Press

Chapter 4 deals specifically with the Kindertransports. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Remember Me A Search for Refuge in Wartime Britain

by Watts, Irene N (2000); Published by Tundra Books

Young Marianne has escaped on one of the first kindertransporte organized to take Jewish children out of Germany to safety in Britain.At first Marianne is desperate. She does not speak English, she is not welcome in her sponsors’ home, and, most of all, she misses her mother terribly. In this companion to Good-bye Marianne, Irene N. Watts has created a memorable character, and a story that is ultimately about hope, not war.

Reconstructing the Past: Refugee Writings on the Kindertransport

by Sharples, Carolyn (2006); Published by Holocaust Studies: A Journal of Culture and History

This article analyses the memoirs of the former refugees themselves and sets out the case for re-examining popular representations of the scheme, addressing the diversity of experience for the children once in England, the hardships and emotional upheaval encountered during this stage of their young lives and looking at some of the limitations of the Kindertransport itself. Volume 12, Number 3, pp. 40-62 May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Postcards to a Little Boy. A Kindertransport Story

by Foner, Henry (2013); Published by Yad Vashem Publications

Henry Foner (Heinz Lichtwitz), who had lost his mother at a young age, was sent from Berlin to Wales and lived there with a Jewish couple, who provided him with a warm, loving home. From the moment they parted, Henry’s father sent him colorful illustrated postcards written in German and later on in English. This authentic and moving document presents the postcards and letters that Henry received from his father and other relatives and friends, along with their translation. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Pearls of Childhood: The Poignant True Wartime Story of a Young Girl Growing Up in an Adopted Land

by Gissing, Vera (1988); Published by New York: St. Martin's Press

Vera Gissing’s account of her life in Prague and in England, where she was one of the Kinder. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Passages From Berlin: Recollections of Former Students and Staff of the Goldschmidt Schule

by Heims, Steve J., ed. (1987); Published by US distributor: Marianne Phiebig

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Part of the Family, Christadelphians and the Kindertransport

by Hensley, Jason

Christadelphians, the Kindertransport, and Rescue from the Holocaust “Part of the Family” is a book and video project attempting to catalogue the lives and experiences of Jewish refugees who lived with Christadelphians during the 1930s and 1940s. To that end, if readers know of anyone who could possibly be included in a future volume, please contact us.

Paper Walls: America and the Refugee Crisis, 1938-1941

by Wyman, David S. (1985); Published by New York: Pantheon Books

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Our Lonely Journey: Remembering the Kindertransport

by Smith, Stephen D. (1999); Published by Kirton, England: Paintbrush Publications

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Other People’s Houses

by Segal, Lore (1986); Published by New York: Ballantine Books

A fictionalized account of Lore Groszmann Segal’s young life in Austria, England and the Dominican Republic.

On My Own: Decoding the Conspiracy of Silence

by Schulhof Rybeck, Erika (2013); Published by Summit Crossroads Press

Erika Schulhof Rybeck tells her story as a tribute to the parents who shielded her from the Nazi hor­rors swirling around her, horrors that led to their deportation and disappear­ance. After being a teacher, mother and volunteer, she looks back at age 84 at rare experiences – living in castles and cottages, being sheltered by Catholics, discov­ering her Jewish heritage, and learning of her illustrious family.

Nuremberg and Beyond: The Memoirs of Sigfried Ramler from 20th Century Europe to Hawaii

by Ramler, Sigfried (2009); Published by Ahuna Press

The book begins with Sig’s childhood in Vienna and follows him at age 14 on the Kindertransport to London, where he experienced the Blitz as well as V-1 and V-2 rocket attacks. After the war, his facility with languages brought him to one of the defining moments of his life: the Nuremberg trials. Working in the new field of simultaneous translation, Sig came face to face with the war’s criminals: Göring, Hess, Höss, and Hitler’s architect, Speer. A meeting with a pretty Hawaiian-Chinese court reporter, Piilani Ahuna, led to marriage and a journey to Hawaii. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Nothing Makes You Free: Writings by Descendants of Jewish Holocaust Survivors

by Bukiet, Melvin Jules (2003); Published by New York: W. W. Norton

Not With Silver Spoon

by Avrays, Harry (1989); Published by Sharon Press

Harry Avray’s Kindertransport memoir. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Non Frangimur: My First Six Decades

by Bowers, Klaus D. (2005); Published by Bloomington, Indiana: AuthorHouse

Kind Klaus D. Bowers recounts his comfortable early childhood in Germany, the tough transition to refugee life in England, his outstanding academic career at Oxford, and his thirty-three years with AT&T’s Bell Labs during its glory days.

Nightmare’s Fairy Tale: A Young Refugee’s Home Fronts, 1938-1948

by Korman, Gerd (2005); Published by University of Wisconsin Press

Korman movingly recounts his childhood years as a refugee in war-ravaged Europe…. The young adult who emerged was a collage of disjointed personas: an American Jew eager to embrace his new home, an immigrant who never shed the traces of his foreign accent, and a historian eager to tell the story that defines him, his family, and his people.—Publishers Weekly The Korman family scattered from a Polish refugee camp just before WWII. The father sailed to Cuba on the ill-fated St. Louis; the mother left for the United States after sending her two sons on a Kindertransport.

Nicky & Vera: A Quiet Hero of the Holocaust and the Children He Rescued

by Sís, Peter (2021); Published by W.W. Norton & Company

In 1938, twenty-nine-year-old Nicholas Winton saved the lives of almost 700 children trapped in Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia. Czech-American artist, MacArthur Fellow, and Andersen Award winner Peter Sís dramatizes Winton’s story in this distinctive and deeply personal picture book. He intertwines Nicky’s efforts with the story of one of the children he saved–a young girl named Vera, whose family enlisted Nicky’s aid when the Germans occupied their country. As the war passes and Vera grows up, she must find balance in her dual identities–one her birthright, the other her choice.

Nicholas Winton and the Rescued Generation

by Emmanuel, Muriel and Vera Gissing (1982); Published by Edgware, England: Vallentine Mitchell Publishers

New Lives: Survivors of the Holocaust Living in America

by Rabinowitz, Dorothy (1976); Published by New York: Alfred A. Knopf

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Never Look Back: The Jewish Refugee Children in Great Britain, 1938-1945

by Tydor Baumel-Schwartz, Judith (2012); Published by Purdue University Press

This book charts the history of the Kindertransport movement, focusing on the dynamics that developed between the British government, the child refugee organizations, the Jewish community in Great Britain, the general British population, and the refugee children. Based on archival sources and follow-up interviews with refugee children both forty and seventy years after their flight to Britain, this book gives a unique perspective into the political, bureaucratic, and human aspects of the Kindertransport scheme prior to and during World War II.

My Train to Freedom: A Jewish Boy’s Journey from Nazi Europe to a Life of Activism

by Backer, Ivan (2016); Published by Skyhorse

The breathtaking memoir by a member of “Nicky’s family,” a group of 669 Czechoslovakian children who escaped the Holocaust through Sir Nicholas Winton’s Kindertransport project, My Train to Freedom relates the trials and achievements of award-winning humanitarian and former Episcopal priest, Ivan Backer. Now an eighty-six-year-old who remains an activist for peace and justice. He has been influenced by his Jewish heritage, his Christian boarding school education in England, and the always present question “For what purpose was I spared the Holocaust?”.

My Heart in a Suitcase

by Fox, Anne (1996); Published by Edgware, England: Vallentine Michell

Anne Fox’s Kindertransport memoir.

My German Question: Growing up in Nazi Berlin

by Gay, Peter (1998); Published by New Haven: Yale University Press

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

My Family for the War

by Voorhoeve, Anne (2012); Published by Dial Books for Young Readers, Penguin Press

At the start of World War II, ten-year-old Franziska Mangold is torn from her family when she boards the kindertransport in Berlin. Taken in by strangers who soon become more like family than her real parents, Frances (as she is now known) courageously pieces together a new life for herself because she doesn’t know when or if she’ll see her true family again. Against the backdrop of war-torn London, Frances struggles with questions of identity, family, and love. Originally published in Germany. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

My Darling Diary, Volume Three

by Jacoby, Ingrid (2009); Published by Cornwall, UK: United Writers Publications Ltd

In her third diary we follow Ingrid Jacoby’s life from the age of 23 to 26 years. Still in Oxford and now working for Rosenthals’ Antiquarian Booksellers, Ingrid remembers, at the age of 12, being transported via Kindertransport from Vienna to Falmouth with her sister Lieselotte, discovering that her mother was lost forever after dying in a German concentration camp and subsequently being unable to properly find a close relationship with her father and his new wife. Eventually Ingrid meets Stan, and as the pages come to a close we know that her heart and life have become secure. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Mothers in Children’s and Young Adult Literature: From the Eighteenth Century to Postfeminism

by Rowe Fraustino, Lisa and Coats, Karen, Editors (2016); Published by University Press of Mississippi

Chapter 4: The Women Who Sent Their Children Away: Mothers in Kindertransport Fiction. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Mit dem Kindertransport in die Freiheit. Vom Jüdischen Flü zum Corporal O’Brian

by Behrendt, Gideon and Claudia Curio (2001); Published by Frankfurt: Fischer

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Missing Girls

by Metzger, Lois (1999); Published by New York: Penguin USA Viking Childrens Books

Lois Metzger’s young adult novel features a young main character whose mother was on a Kindertransport.

Men of Vision, Anglo-Jewry’s Aid to Victims of the Nazi Regime

by Gottlieb, Amy (1998); Published by London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Memory

by Lichtenstein, Jonathan (2006); Published by London: Nick Hern Books Limited

A drama involving a Kindertransport family, Memory was first performed at Clwyd Theatr Cymru in Wales in November 2006 and subsequently produced at the 59E59 Theaters in New York City in 2007. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Memories that Won’t Go Away: A Tribute to the Children of the Kindertransport

by Gold, Michele (2014); Published by Kotarim International Publishing, Ltd

Memories That Won’t Go Away tells the stories of hundreds of these kinder. Their experiences as strangers in a strange land were often complicated and painful, but as this book illustrates, the rescued children – and their many thousands of descendants – remain grateful to the nation that saved them.

Making Things Better

by Brookner, Anita (2002); Published by New York: Random House

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Making An Entrance, the Biography of Gerard Gould

by Martin, Margaret (2010); Published by D R Green

Gerard Gould is a teacher and director of amateur drama with a uniquely charismatic personality, and those gifts are rare enough to merit attention; but the life of the man behind the work is truly fascinating. He was born Günter Goldstein in Germany in 1922, the youngest child of a prosperous Jewish family. He was a witness (and a perceptive, profoundly intelligent witness) to the gathering horror that was Nazi Germany. He came to England on a Kindertransport.

Love Despite Hate: Child Survivors of the Holocaust and Their Adult Lives

by Moskovitz, Sarah (1983); Published by New York: Schocken Books

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Living After the Holocaust: Reflections by the Post-war Generation in America

by Steinitz, Lucy and David Szonyi, eds. (1976); Published by New York: Bloch Publishing

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Liverpool Street

by Voorhoeve, Anne C (2008); Published by Ravensburger Verlag

Contained within the story of ten-year-old Ziska (Franziska Mangold) is a whole slice of prewar and wartime history, from Kristallnacht to Auschwitz, from the Kindertransport taking Jewish children to safety in England (hence the title ‘Liverpool Street’) to the varied fortunes of the young refugees, and from wartime sacrifices to deportations to the Isle of Man. This moving novel portrays the growing up of a young girl amongst scenes of great tragedy. Currently available in German only, translations will soon be released: USA (Penguin); France; Netherlands. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Little Holocaust Survivors: And the English School That Saved Them

by Wolfenden, Barbara (2008); Published by Praeger

As Europe prepared for war, the newly-founded Stoatley Rough School began to shelter hundreds of traumatized Jewish children fleeing (usually alone) from Nazi persecution. Little Holocaust Survivors, based on dozens of original interviews, tells their stories, and the stories of the teachers and benefactors who created this refuge in a country house on a hillside in Surrey, donated by its philanthropic owner. Author Barbara Wolfenden (wife of one of the boys educated at Stoatley Rough) has interviewed many of the children (both ‘Hut Boys’ and ‘Household Girls’) from the school. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Little Eden

by Figes, Eva (1988); Published by New York: Persea Books

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Literatur und Holocaust

by Bayer, Gerd and Freiburg, Rudolf (2009); Published by Koenigshausen & Neumann

The chapter “Die Erfahrung des Kindertransports in der Englischen Literatur,” by Christoph Houswitschka, pages 76-97, may be of interest. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Lily Renée, Escape Artist: From Holocaust Survivor to Comic Book Pioneer

by Robbins, Trina (2011); Published by Lerner Publishing Group

In 1938, Lily Renée Wilheim is a 14-year-old Jewish girl living in Vienna. Then the Nazis march into Austria, and Lily’s life is shattered overnight. Suddenly, her own country is no longer safe for her or her family. To survive, Lily leaves her parents behind and travels alone to England. In this graphic novel for readers 10-14, follow the story of a brave girl who becomes an artist of heroes and a true pioneer in comic books.

Lifesaving Letters: A Child’s Flight from the Holocaust

by Roth, Milena (2004); Published by Seattle: University of Washington Press

Letter to Alexander: A Family’s Kindertransport Experience

by Laxova, Renata (2001); Published by Cincinnati, OH: Custom Editorial Productions

May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Learning to Die in Miami: Confessions of a Refugee Boy

by Eire, Carlos (2010); Published by Free Press

With the same passionate immediacy as Eire brought to his memoir of a Cuban boyhood, the National Book Award–winning Waiting for Snow in Havana (2002), he writes now about coming to America at age 11. The story takes readers from the journey to American itself – Eire was one of 14,000 unaccompanied refugee children in 1962’s Operation Pedro Pan – through his time in foster homes, both kind and harsh, and eventually to joining his uncle in Chicago, “where everyone came from somewhere else.”

Last Waltz in Vienna: The Rise and Destruction of a Family: 1842-1942

by Clare, George (1982); Published by New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston

Kindertransport: Terror, Trauma and Triumph

by Sharples, Carolyn (2004); Published by History Today Magazine

Caroline Sharples discusses the bitter-sweet experiences of the Jewish children permitted to travel to England to escape the Nazi regime, leaving their families behind them. May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Kindertransport: Memory, Identity and the British-Jewish Diaspora

by Neumeier, Beate (2003); Published by Rodopi

This chapter in the book “Diaspora and Multiculturalism: Common Traditions and New Developments” provides a comparative and insightful analysis of Lore Segal’s personal account “Other People’s Houses;” Diane Samuel’s stage play “Kindertransport,” and the documentary film “Into the Arms of Strangers.” May be out of print. Try your local library or Holocaust Memorial Center.

Kindertransport: A Child’s Journey

by Conway, Jeanne and Sosa, Kena (2019); Published by 4rv Children's Corner

Just before the outbreak of World War II, the Nazis pushed Jewish families to do something they never imagined they would. They sent their children away on a train to faraway places to live with strangers so that they would be safe until the danger passed. As she gets onboard the Kindertransport, a train to hope, ten-year-old Helen will never be the same.