KINDERTRANSPORT IN THE NEWS (2013)

 

Alexander Wilde, now 90 years old. Photo: Glenn Russell, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press)

Alexander Wilde, now 90 years old. Photo: Glenn Russell, The Burlington (Vt.) Free Press)


Kindertransport saved this man's life 75 years ago

His father had been taken to Dachau but wrote to tell his mother 'to get the child out.'

First he was kicked out of school. Then Alexander Wilde's family was kicked out of their home, he watched soldiers take his father away, his mother put him on a train to safety and he was unsure whether he would ever see her again.

Article and video from USA Today and the Burlington VT Free Press.

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Kindertransport survivors tell escape story

Seventy-five years ago, 7-year-old Susanne Goldsmith watched her father wave goodbye, clutching a handkerchief in a crowd of people at a railroad station in Vienna, Austria.

Burbank residents Goldsmith, 82, and David Meyerhof, whose mother was on the Kindertransport from Berlin, shared their stories at the Burbank Town Center Monday in commemoration of World Kindertransport Day and the 75th anniversary of the mission.

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( Tim Berger / Staff Photographer / December 2, 2013 )

( Tim Berger / Staff Photographer / December 2, 2013 )


Photo Gallery: World Kindertransport Day, Burbank, CA

A group photo of Kinder, with members of the Burbank City Council and the Temple Beth Emet President Ira L. Goldstein and organizer and KT2 David Meyerhof at recognition of the 75th anniversary of the first Kindertransport at the Burbank Town Center on Monday, December 2, 2013. Kindertransport moved as many as 10,000 Jewish refugee children to safety from the Nazis by train and ship, mostly to England, from Vienna, Berlin, Prague and other major cities.

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World Kindertransport Day

Radio interview on the site specific play "suitcases" being performed at a train station Liverpool in November, 2013.

In the months between the Kristallnacht Pogrom of 9-10 November 1938, and the start of the Second World War nearly 10,000 children were sent, without their parents, out of Nazi Germany, Austria, Poland, and Czechoslovakia to safety in Great Britain.

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Kindertransport survivors Harry Heber, Alfred Buechler and Ruth Jacobs (photo credit: BlakeEzraPhotography)

Kindertransport survivors Harry Heber, Alfred Buechler and Ruth Jacobs (photo credit: BlakeEzraPhotography)


London marks 75th anniversary of Kindertransport

LONDON — “It was the festival of Hanukkah. The transports left in the evening… the authorities didn’t want the population to know what was going on. So, after we lit the candles my father blessed us and then we made our way to the station,” says Ruth Jacobs, who, together with her brother Harry Heber traveled by Kindertransport from Vienna to Britain in December 1938.

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From kindergarten to Kindertransport - Christiane Amanpour

Monday is world Kindertransport Day: the 75th anniversary of one of the great humanitarian missions of modern times.

Imagine a world where 10,000 children were rescued from the holocaust by the kindness of strangers.

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Boca Raton, Florida, Declares World Kindertransport Day

The Mayor of Boca Raton, Florida, declares December 2, 2013, World Kindertransport Day.

Lizzie (center), Ilse (bottom right), Hans (bottom left) Fritz (bottom center) and their parents.

Lizzie (center), Ilse (bottom right), Hans (bottom left) Fritz (bottom center) and their parents.


How Kindertransports Saved My Family

When her parents escorted 16-year-old Alice, my aunt, to the Vienna train station, her father was crying. Her mother on the other hand, remained strong and optimistic. “She said, ‘We’re going to see each other again,’” Alice, nicknamed Lizzie, remembered. ”And I was like, I’m going to England, and I’ll be able to improve my English.”

Seventy-five years ago today, on December 2, 1938, the first “Kindertransport” arrived from Germany in England.

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Willman, an only child, pictured above holding a copy of her 1939 German passport, arrived from Vienna in April 1939.

Willman, an only child, pictured above holding a copy of her 1939 German passport, arrived from Vienna in April 1939.


Kindertransport, 75 years on: 'It was fantastic to feel free at last'

Seventy-five years ago this week, the first group of children arrived without their parents at the Essex port of Harwich, and took a train to London's Liverpool Street station.

After the war, many of the children settled in Britain, their families having been murdered by the Nazis.These are the stories of five of those children.

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Anniversary party for Kindertransport law

Marking the 75th anniversary of the Parliamentary debate that led to their rescue, the event began with a ceremony to rededicate the commemorative plaque unveiled in 1999 in gratitude for Parliament’s decision in November 1938 to start up the Kindertransport.

Paying tribute to the Kinder, Speaker John Bercow also noted the huge strides made in the protection of human rights since the Holocaust.

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The memorial entitled 'Children of the Kindertransport' is to thank the people of Britain for saving the lives of 10,000 children who fled from Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939. Photo by AP

The memorial entitled 'Children of the Kindertransport' is to thank the people of Britain for saving the lives of 10,000 children who fled from Nazi persecution in 1938 and 1939. Photo by AP


Survivors remember Kindertransport flight from Nazis

Monday is World Kindertransport Day, with events to mark the anniversary in many countries.

Seventy-five years ago this week, the first group of kids arrived without their parents at the English port of Harwich, and took a train to London's Liverpool Street Station.

Some 10,000 children, most but not all Jewish, would escape the Nazis in the months to come — until the outbreak of war in September 1939, when the borders were closed.

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Survivors recall fleeing Nazis in Kindertransport

LONDON - The operation was called Kindertransport - Children's Transport - and it was a passage from hell to freedom.

Kristallnacht had just rocked Nazi Germany. The pogroms killed dozens of Jews, burned hundreds of synagogues and imprisoned tens of thousands in concentration camps. Many historians see them as the start of Hitler's Final Solution.

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World Kindertransport Day: Surivivors Recall Children's Flight From Nazis

Seventy-five years ago this week, the first group of kids arrived without their parents at the English port of Harwich, and took a train to London's Liverpool Street Station.

Some 10,000 children, most but not all Jewish, would escape the Nazis in the months to come — until the outbreak of war in September 1939, when the borders were closed.

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Actors perform Suitcase at Temple Meads station Picture: Dan Regan

Actors perform Suitcase at Temple Meads station Picture: Dan Regan


Station hosts re-enactment of Kindertransports' arrival

The concourse and platform of the Bristol railway station was the setting for Suitcase – a play about the first arrival of the Kindertransport in Britain – yesterday.

In 1938 and 1939 thousands of mainly Jewish children were transported to the safety of foster families in Britain, arriving via ports such as Harwich before moving on to their new homes.

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Judy Benton as a child (second from right) with her family. Her parents later died in Auschwitz

Judy Benton as a child (second from right) with her family. Her parents later died in Auschwitz


I escaped Hitler's Germany and built a new life

When Hitler came to power, everything changed. By 1938 the Hitler Youth were very visible in my school. Suddenly no one spoke to me – if they did, they got into trouble. I was moved to the back of the class and my desk was painted yellow and said "here sits a dirty Jewish girl". My work was no longer corrected, and despite being top of my class, I was not allowed to win the first place award – a copy of Mein Kampf.

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World Kindertransport Day Proclamation

World Kindertransport Day Proclamation


Burbank, California Proclaims December 2, 2013 World Kindertransport Day

KT2 David Meyerhof, resident of Burbank, California has made this happen!

He will be speaking with Kind Suzanne Goldsmith on December 2nd, see the events page listing.


Congressman Adam Schiff recognizes the 75th Kindertransport Anniversary

Adam Schiff, representative of the 28th District of California recognizes the Seventy Fifth anniversary of the Kindertransports.

Thanks to KT2 David Meyerhof, resident of Burbank, California.

David will be speaking with Kind Suzanne Goldsmith on December 2nd, see the events page listing.

Susanne Goldsmith. Goldsmith, 82, was whisked out of Nazi-occupied Vienna with her brother Peter on Dec. 10, 1938 on  a Kindertransport. (Photo by John McCoy)

Susanne Goldsmith. Goldsmith, 82, was whisked out of Nazi-occupied Vienna with her brother Peter on Dec. 10, 1938 on a Kindertransport. (Photo by John McCoy)


On World Kindertransport Day, Burbank resident recalls escaping Holocaust

Young Susanne and Peter Weiss had been whisked to England two years earlier when a strange couple appeared on their doorstep.

The two Jewish children hadn’t seen their parents, Hans and Margaret, since fleeing Vienna aboard a Kindertransport.

“They looked like such refugees,” recalled Susanne Goldsmith, now 82, of Burbank, of that day more than 70 years ago. “They were poorly dressed. They were haggard. Neither of us wanted to join them.

“But we did — my parents didn’t give up.”

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Survivor of holocaust dies, aged 81

Leo Metzstein, was one of the last of 10,000 Jewish children to flee Germany under the Kindertransport scheme before the war broke out in 1939.

Born in Berlin, he was the youngest of five Metzstein children to escape the country in August 1939, with his sister Jenny. He lived in Hamilton, South Lanarkshire.

He was the brother of the acclaimed architect Isi Metzstein, who died in January 2012.

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Gabrielle Dempsey (Eva) and Paula Wilcox (Lil)

Gabrielle Dempsey (Eva) and Paula Wilcox (Lil)


UK tour of Diane Samuels' Kindertransport opened at Royal Brighton

The revival of Diane Samuels' Kindertransport has been prompted by the 75th anniversary of the first arrivals of the kinder, something that has led to another play on the subject, Suitcase, also touring this autumn.

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Kindertransport: Burbank residents recall the rescue of Jewish children

A video interview is online with Kindertransportee Susanne Weiss Goldsmith and KT2 David Meyerhof.
The City of Burbank, CA proclaims December 2, 2013, World Kindertransport Day.

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RIVIERA BEACH PREP STUDENTS COMMEMORATE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF KINDERTRANSPORT

The purpose of Student Awareness Day on the Kindertransport was to honor survivors, their parents and the people who saved the lives of 10,000 children.

“Our students understood that the Holocaust should be viewed in various perspectives and the Kindertransport is one of them,” Riviera Beach Prep Teacher Toshimi Abe-Janiga. “They made a personal connection between the past and the present and through Holocaust Education, we hope they can take action to prevent prejudice and discrimination.”

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Harry Themal, Deleware News Journal columnist

Harry Themal, Deleware News Journal columnist


Harry Themal: 75 years ago the Kindertransport saved my life

This has been an important year for memorable anniversaries but for this columnist the most important occasion was 75 years ago. That was when England created the Kindertransport and 10,000 mostly Jewish children, including myself, were brought to safety from the Nazi terror.

Thanksgiving is an apt time to remember our English rescuers.

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Performer Mona Golabek (left) chats with Ralph Samuel of Oakland and Ilse Eden of Berkeley. photo/dan pine

Performer Mona Golabek (left) chats with Ralph Samuel of Oakland and Ilse Eden of Berkeley. photo/dan pine


One-woman play in Berkeley hits home for local ‘Kinder’

With anti-Semitism rampant and war looming, Ralph Samuel fled his hometown of Dresden, Germany, for safety in England. He was all alone.

Then only 7, Samuel was one of nearly 10,000 Jewish children who escaped Germany and Austria in the famed Kindertransport.

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Survivors to mark 75th anniversary of Kindertransport

On the evening of Dec. 2, a group of elderly men and women, some with their children and grandchildren, will gather at a Burbank mall to mark the 75th anniversary of a heartbreaking, yet uplifting, episode of the Nazi era, known as the Kindertransport (in English, Children’s Transport).

The event, part of the Temple Beth Emet Chanukah program, will start at 7:30 p.m. on the second floor of the Burbank Media Center Mall, at 245 E. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank. The public is invited.

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From left, Rella Adler, Lisa Saretzky, Mark Burin and Anita Hoffer will share their experiences as participants in the Kindertransport during a Dec. 8 program commemorating the 75th anniversary

From left, Rella Adler, Lisa Saretzky, Mark Burin and Anita Hoffer will share their experiences as participants in the Kindertransport during a Dec. 8 program commemorating the 75th anniversary


Commemorating Kindertransport's 75th anniversary

Anita Lowenberg was living in Berlin with her mother and grandparents in June 1939 when the 6-year-old was told one morning to pack some clothing. Lowenberg soon joined other children on a train to Holland and then a ferry to London as part of the Kindertransport.

Now Anita Hoffman, 80, of Boca Raton, will join other Florida members of the Kindertransport at a Dec. 8 cocktail reception and program in Boca Raton to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Kindertransport.

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KINDERTRANSPORT Opens Burning Coal's Second Stage 2013-14 Season Tonight

Between 1938 and the outbreak of World War II, thousands of Jewish children living in Germany were sent to Great Britain on the Kindertransport. This move saved them from the concentration camps their parents would soon face. Diane Samuels' play offers deep insight into themes of abandonment, identity, survivors' guilt, and the effects of a traumatic past on those near to us. The story follows Eva, a 9 year old Kind, and the effect her mother's fateful decision had on a generation of women.

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Wartime Kindertransport remembered with Lime Street station performance

Johanna Hacker rarely spoke of the day her parents buttoned her into an English-style coat, carefully chosen so she wouldn’t stand out, and waved her off at the railway station in Vienna.

One of the 9,500 unaccompanied children from Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia to be rescued from Nazi occupation in the Kindertransport project, she and her two sisters, Paula and Melanie, were whisked off to England safe from harm.

Suitcase 1938 is touring stations across the UK until December 2

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GVL / Hannah Mico. The main character of "Kindertransport," Eva, is played by Marllory Caillaud-Jones.

GVL / Hannah Mico. The main character of "Kindertransport," Eva, is played by Marllory Caillaud-Jones.


'Did they die for you to forget?'

For most people, it’s an accepted fact that six million Jews died in concentration camps during the Holocaust. But what is not widely discussed is the 10,000 children from Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia who were saved via the Kindertransport.

Grand Valley State University senior Amanda Furstenberg was interested in doing a play about the Holocaust for her senior honors project, so she approached professor and director Karen Libman. The two decided to share the story of the children.

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Documentary on Leonore Goldschmidt and her Goldschmidt Schule airs on tv

GERMANY: 'Goldschmidts Kinder - Überleben in Hitlers Schatten'
- November 4th, 2013 at 23:30 on ARD Television, Germany.
- November 5th, 2013 at 03:25 on ARD Television.
- November 7th, 2013 at 20:15 on tagesschau24.


USA: "The Teacher who Defied Hitler'
- November 16th, 2013 at 08:00pm (ET/PT) on Smithsonian Channel.
- November 16th, 2013 at 11:00pm (ET/PT) on Smithsonian Channel.
- November 19th, 2013 at 10:00am (ET/PT) on Smithsonian Channel.

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Hanus Grosz with Kindertransport Quilts

Hanus Grosz with Kindertransport Quilts


Indianapolis man among children rescued from Nazi rule by long unknown hero

For more than five decades, Hanus Grosz did not know the name of the man who saved him from the Nazis.

He did not know who had arranged to whisk him and nearly 700 other children out of Czechoslavakia and into new homes in England.

Seemingly chance encounters and fleeting moments of kindness may govern the course of many lives.

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Kindertransport: Real stories inspires stage version

During World War II thousands of children, most of whom were Jewish, had to leave their parents and travel to the UK to escape persecution.

Survivors - like Ursula Rosenfield - were kept safe by the kindertransport mission.

Now railway stations across Britain will be the setting for a theatre production telling their story. Executive producer of Suitcase, and KT2, Jane Merkin, spoke to BBC about her show.

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Otto Deutsch at the site where his parents and sister were killed

Otto Deutsch at the site where his parents and sister were killed


Kristallnacht 75th anniversary: Two survivors share extraordinary stories

Two survivors who experienced first-hand the destruction, intimidation and violence during Kristallnacht give extraordinary accounts of their time surviving the ordeal and their eventual rescue by the British mission known as the Kindertransport.

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Kindertransport play coming to UK train station

75 years ago, train stations across Britain filled with child refugees arriving from Nazi-occupied Europe, at the start of what became known as the Kindertransport.

Now, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the rescue mission, which saved more than 9,500 children, a theatre company is touring station platforms across the UK, with a production portraying the experience of those children.

Suitcase is a theatre piece that fuses a site-specific promenade performance with live music.

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75 years since the Night of Broken Glass

“I walked by our synagogue. Hordes of people were standing in front of it and throwing stones through the beautiful stained-glass windows. They had gone into the synagogue, ransacked it and threw the Torah scrolls into the streets,” Neumann recalled.

As soon as she arrived at school, her teacher said, “Something horrible happened last night. Your parents have been alerted, and they will come pick you up.”

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Sex, Jews, and the undeniable resurgence of Dr. Ruth

The 85-year-old former Kindertransport child and Haganah sniper is still talking sex in the media and making waves.

By Debra Nussbaum Cohen

In the Haaretz newspaper (you must register and sign in to read the full article)

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World ignores Gypsy plight, says refugee from Nazis

A refugee from Nazi Germany has published a book for children to counter prejudice against Gypsies.

Ruth Barnett, who came here on a Kindertransport from Berlin at the age of 4 in 1939, draws parallels between the Jewish and Gypsy experience.

“I have been going into schools for Holocaust education to tell my Kindertransport story for over a decade,” she explained, “and I don’t think it has its full value unless I link it with what we are allowing to happen today.

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Edith Goldberg, Leeds, UK

Edith Goldberg, Leeds, UK


Edith Goldberg, 1928-2013

11-year-old Edith Michel arrived in Leeds with her younger sister Irmgard – both found safe havens with Jewish families.

Born in Kaiserslautern on May 13, 1928, she grew up in a little village, population of around 200, of whom only 20 were Jewish.

Edith was one of the Holocaust Survivors’ Friendship Association’s greatest supporters.

It was only in the past five years that she began to speak in schools, to children who were the same age as she was when she left her homeland.

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Henrietta Franks (L-R), Margot Showman, Henry Gruen, Lore Robinson, Hellfried Heilbutt and Ernest Kolman stand in front of photos from their childhood. EPA/Oliver Berg

Henrietta Franks (L-R), Margot Showman, Henry Gruen, Lore Robinson, Hellfried Heilbutt and Ernest Kolman stand in front of photos from their childhood. EPA/Oliver Berg


Cologne, Germany Survivors Of WWII Kindertransport Reunite At Exhibit

Cologne, Germany - Survivors of “Kindertransport,” reunited this week at a commemorative exhibit. The exhibit is open 16 October - 24 November, 2013.

90 year-old Henrietta Franks was 15 when she left Cologne, and “My sister was 12, crying for a whole year.”

Franks' parents fled to southern France, but her father was picked up by the Nazis, telling her mother, “I’ll see you in England.” That was the last her family heard from her father.

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Kindertransport on German television

Short video broadcast on ZDF featuring Kind Bernd Koschland and rescuer Sir Nicholas Winton.

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A truly contented man

One of the youngest children on the Kindertransport, Paul Alexander leads a successful life; his only regret is that he never hit a six in cricket.

Perhaps the true heroes in Paul Alexander’s extraordinary story are his parents who, in 1939, sent their 16-month-old only child on a Kindertransport from their Leipzig home to safe haven in England.

Today he lives in Ra’anana with his Israeli wife, Nili, works as a lawyer and leads a satisfying and pleasant life.

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Old Pupill John Karlick outside the Fulneck Moravian Church, Pudsey, Leeds

Old Pupill John Karlick outside the Fulneck Moravian Church, Pudsey, Leeds


Return to school for a survivor

On boarding a packed train out of Nazi-occupied Prague in June 1939, nine-year-old John Karlik and his younger sister Vera didn’t realise they were waving goodbye to their father for the final time.

The pair escaped after Moravian clergyman Bishop Shaw, who was on a visit to Prague, arranged for them to catch what turned out to be the last train out of the city and offered them refuge at his home in Fulneck, Pudsey.

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Hamden Hall lecture series

Hamden Hall Country Day School’s community lecture series features a documentary that tells the inspirational story of the Czech Kindertransport that rescued 669 children in the early days of Nazi occupation.

Nicky’s Family will screen in Hamden Hall’s Taylor Performing Arts Center Tuesday, Oct. 22, 6:30 p.m.

Following the screening, Mr. Ivan Backer will discuss his personal experience on the Kindertransport. Mr. Backer’s mother put him on a train in Prague bound for London in May 1939.

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‘If you look at anyone’s life, it’s pretty crazy. That you don’t end up on the rocks somewhere is just a miracle’ … director Michael Roemer. Photograph: Harold Shapiro.

‘If you look at anyone’s life, it’s pretty crazy. That you don’t end up on the rocks somewhere is just a miracle’ … director Michael Roemer. Photograph: Harold Shapiro.


Director Michael Roemer on his seminal 60s drama Nothing But a Man

He fled the Nazis for a British boarding school – then made a shocking drama about segregation in the deep south. Michael Roemer talks fate, family and sadistic governesses

In the last 10 days, I have seen three films by Roemer: two documentaries and Nothing But a Man, his first feature, shot in 1963...if I could reach out and grab your collar I would: do whatever you can to see these films.

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Sig, bottom left, and Zilla Koppold were very young when they arrived in England. Dana Binke, left, was their guarantor, at left cousins Edith and Paula, also on the Kindertransport

Sig, bottom left, and Zilla Koppold were very young when they arrived in England. Dana Binke, left, was their guarantor, at left cousins Edith and Paula, also on the Kindertransport


Sig Silber's Great Adventure

You live in Leipzig. It is 1939. The world is imploding. It is exploding. Nothing is safe. Nothing makes sense.

Because of your family connections, you have a chance to save your children. It would mean putting them on a train — yes, all of them, even the baby — and sending them far away. You will not be able to protect them once they arrive, and you might never see them again.

You have very little time to make the decision.

What do you do?

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Kim Masters on the New Movie Detailing Her Mother's Escape From the Nazis

"Nicky's Family," out July 19, shows how the "British Schindler" saved hundreds of children from Hitler's forces, including Masters' own mom.

My grandmother's name was Sidonia, and she lived with my grandfather Salamon in the remote mountain village of Trstena, then part of Czechoslovakia (now Slovakia). They had three little girls, among them my mother, Alice. For most of my mother’s childhood, they lived in a couple of rooms in a house with no electricity or running water.

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Kindertransport Film Elides Hero's Role

Nicholas Winton is someone whose life is a worthy subject. He was an English Holocaust rescuer who was the primary moving force behind the Kindertransport program that rescued Czech Jewish children from the Nazis.

Unfortunately, each of Minac’s three films on Winton is preachy, bathetic and clumsily manipulative. Nicky's Family, the latest film is certainly the best of the three, but that is a relative judgment.

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Gunter and Rosalind Ruf with the prince of Wales

Gunter and Rosalind Ruf with the prince of Wales


A Princely Reception For Former Refugees

On the 75th anniversary, the Prince of Wales hosted a reception in honor of a few hundred aging Kindertransport participants.The prince spent two hours at the event, which was sponsored by the Association of Jewish Refugees.

Prince Charles “was charming. He seems interested in everybody, and I was very impressed,” Joe Garten of Roslyn, L.I., who attended the reception with his fellow-refugee wife, Bea, told the Jewish Chronicle.

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Kindertransportees Ann and Bob Kirk meet HRH The Prince of Wales

Kindertransportees Ann and Bob Kirk meet HRH The Prince of Wales


Hundreds gather for 75th anniversary reunion of Kindertransportees

More than 400 now elderly people started new lives in Britain after they were sent from countries including Germany, Austria and Czechoslovakia in the Kindertransport.

They gathered at the Jewish Free School, in the Mall, Kenton on Sunday for a reunion, and survivors and their families attended a lunchtime reception hosted by HRH The Prince of Wales on Monday.

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Hundreds gather for Kindertransport reunion

Hundreds gather for Kindertransport reunion


Hundreds gather for Kindertransport reunion

A generation of young Jewish refugees who escaped Nazi occupied Europe as children met again for the 75th reunion of the movement that helped them escape.

More than 400 who took part in the Kindertransport met at the Jewish Free School, in The Mall, Kenton, on Sunday June 23 for the reunion.

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Swansea Kindertransport girl gets royal invite

MEMORIES of fleeing pre-war Nazi Germany have come flooding back to a Gower pensioner following a royal invitation to visit London.

Ellen Davis arrived in Swansea in 1939 as one of 10,000 Jewish children sent abroad to escape Nazi atrocities. The rest of her family, including her brother and sisters, were sent to a concentration camp in Latvia where they were shot and killed.

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Alfred and Miriam Buechler

Alfred and Miriam Buechler


Married Ilford couple who survived Nazi persecution marked 75th Kindertrans

Alfred Buechler, 87, and wife Miriam, 78, were guests of Prince Charles on Monday to remember the Kindertransport – a rescue mission that brought around 10,000 children here between 1938 and 1939.

Alfred was one of the Kinder, as the rescued children refer to themselves, while Miriam survived two Nazi camps with the rest of her family.

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Bernd Koschland, transported from Bavaria, aged 8

Bernd Koschland, transported from Bavaria, aged 8


Kindertransport: Children who fled the Nazis to Britain

Ten thousand children were evacuated by parents desperate to get them to safety. Acts of commemoration are taking place this week, but as survivors grow old, how should their stories be remembered? BBC Newsnight hears the stories of four of them.

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Reporter Susan Bookbinder with 2g's Barbara Dresner and Thomas Bonin

Reporter Susan Bookbinder with 2g's Barbara Dresner and Thomas Bonin


Susan Bookbinder: The Most Challenging Story I've Ever Covered

"Learn, Learn, Learn - they can take everything from you except what's in your brain". A mother's last words to her teenage daughter at Leipzig Central Station in August 1939.

Feige Mendzigursky wore a name tag stamped with swastikas around her neck - the pass was virtually all she had - but it was to save her life.

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Young Leo Metzstein

Young Leo Metzstein


Leo's "Miracle" Escape From Nazi Killers

Leo Metzstein, 81, was one of 10,000 Jewish children living in Germany who were allowed out the country by Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler before the outbreak of World War II in 1939.

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When We Did Not Do Enough

One of the most interesting things about the coverage of Margaret Thatcher's death was the revelation that her father, Alderman Roberts of Grantham, took in a Jewish refugee girl and gave her a new life. The story was similar to that of the Attenboroughs - the parents of Richard and David - who provided a home for two German Jewish girls who arrived here on the Kindertransport.

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Rabbi Bernd Koschland speaking with schoolchildren

Rabbi Bernd Koschland speaking with schoolchildren


Newsnight at Torriano – Kindertransport Memorial

Year 6 welcomed several very special guests on Thursday afternoon. Not only did Rabbi Bernd Koschland come to tell the children all about his experiences of the Kindertransport, he brought along with him the Newsnight film crew!

Rabbi Bernd’s story is remarkable. Born in a small town near Nuremburg in Germany, he witnessed first hand world changing events.

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Kindertransport: 'To my dying day, I will be grateful to this country'

The candles were lit for the Jewish festival of Hanukkah as 10-year-old Ruth Heber and her seven-year-old brother Harry left their family’s rented rooms in Vienna for the last time, almost 75 years ago. “Our father blessed us and we went to the station,” she remembers. “It was in the evening so the public would not know what was going on. My parents were not allowed on the platform. They said: 'Be a good girl and we will be writing and thinking of you and we will be coming very soon.’”

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Eva Schaal left Berlin during the Holocaust on the Kindertransport, a rescue mission to get Jewish children out of Nazi Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland and the Free City of Danzig.

Eva Schaal left Berlin during the Holocaust on the Kindertransport, a rescue mission to get Jewish children out of Nazi Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland and the Free City of Danzig.


Your Neighbor: Eva Schaal

Eva Schaal remembers the night Adolf Hitler came to power.

She was 11 years old, and was performing on stage when she heard an announcement over the city’s loudspeakers: Hitler had been appointed chancellor of Germany.

That night, Schaal saw swastikas all over the streets of Berlin. She vividly remembers seeing soldiers marching in celebration.

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Holocaust survivor shares story

Lore Jacobs, whose 89th birthday is Wednesday, and her daughter Gale Halpern spoke to students Monday about Jacobs' own story. She was born in Frankfurt, like Anne Frank, and both girls grew up Jewish in mixed neighborhoods. Both were also victims of discrimination, but Jacobs was able to escape Germany through a program called the Kindertransport.

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Kindertransport rescue movement to be focus of Yom Hashoah event Thursday

Kurt and Margaret Goldberger had much in common when they met at a social club in New York City in 1947, two years after World War II.

Both owed their lives to a unique program that transported Jewish children, without their parents, out of Nazi-controlled regions of Europe to safety in England.

The Goldbergers will tell their stories at 7 p.m. Thursday April 11 at the Interfaith Holocaust Commemoration at Congregation B'nai Emunah, 17th Street and Peoria Avenue, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

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A four-month mitzvah saving 50 children

When it comes to memories as an 8-year-old in 1938, Kurt Herman can recall: how his school friends in Vienna shunned him days after Hitler annexed Austria; how his father hid at the top of a closet when Nazis searched their apartment; and he and 49 other children were rescued in the largest single kindertransport to the United States.

But even Herman, now 83, was surprised to learn some of the details that emerge from a new documentary, 50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus.

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HBO Documentary '50 Children: The Rescue Mission Of Mr. And Mrs. Kraus'

Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus lived a comfortable life in 1930s Philadelphia, where he made a good living as a lawyer, and she kept a stylish house.

They were secular Jews who sent their children to a Quaker school, and unlikely candidates for the mission they assigned themselves. Gilbert revealed the plan to his wife as he was shaving in the bathroom, so their young son and daughter would not hear.

He wanted to go to Vienna and save 50 Jewish children from the Nazis.

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Inge O. Langham, 1925-2013

Inge (Blank) Langham died in Napa on March 30, 2013, surrounded by family. She was born in 1925 in Dortmund, Germany. After Kristallnacht, Inge arrived with her sister, Doris, in England via the Kindertransport in 1938. She survived the Blitz in England and arrived in the United States in 1940, where she completed her education.

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50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus

HBO Documentary Tells Story of Kindertransport That Saved 50 Children

Film Reveals Philadelphia Family's Role in Daring Rescue

50 Children: The Rescue Mission of Mr. and Mrs. Kraus,” will be aired April 8, 2013 at 9 p.m., on HBO.

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Yale’s pioneering archive of Shoah Testimonies

Kind Geoffrey Hartman has written an article for Tablet.

What the Dead Have To Say to Us
Yale’s pioneering archive of Shoah testimonies reshaped the way tragedies are remembered. But are we listening?

In the spring of 1979, Dori Laub, a Yale psychiatrist and child survivor of the Holocaust, and Laurel Vlock, a dynamic New Haven radio and TV interviewer, met with four survivors who had volunteered to answer questions about their experiences... the session lasted past midnight.

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Carl Davis: Composer's Kindertransport homage

The heart breaking journey more than 10,000 Jewish children made to flee Nazi persecution might sound an unlikely subject for a children's choir.

But that was the suggestion award-winning conductor and composer Carl Davis made when he was commissioned to write a choral piece for the Halle Orchestra's children's choir.

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Holocaust Memorial Day: Kindertransport remembered in music

Composer Carl Davis has written a piece of music to commemorate Holocaust Memorial Day and the journey made by Jewish children from Nazi-occupied Europe, known as Kindertransport.

See video on the BBC website

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Pcture showing Harry's parents suitcase (Jacob Greilsamer bottom left) Photo: BNPS

Pcture showing Harry's parents suitcase (Jacob Greilsamer bottom left) Photo: BNPS


Poignant photograph that proves pensioner's family died at Auschwitz

The photograph appeared "out of the blue" and showed a battered black suitcase, a name, and a number.

It finally proved what the Dorset pensioner had long suspected – that his parents and grandmother perished in the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz nearly seven decades ago.

Mr Grenville and his sister were among 10,000 Jewish children evacuated from Germany to Britain before the war as part of the Kindertransport refugee mission.

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Son shares father's Kindertransport documentary

More than 70 years ago, English stockbroker Nicholas Winton did something that would forever change the lives of 669 children.

Recently the now 103-year-old Winton's life has been made into a documentary "Nicky's Family," which tells his story and those of the children of the Kindertransport through firsthand accounts and dramatic reenactment. To celebrate the American release of the film his son Nick Winton visited Wellington Community High School to put a face to the triumphant story.

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Holocaust survivor Doris Small, center, with daughter Miriam Saunders,  left, and granddaughter Jenniffer Veno (Genaro Molina, Los Angeles Times/Nov 4, 2012)

Holocaust survivor Doris Small, center, with daughter Miriam Saunders, left, and granddaughter Jenniffer Veno (Genaro Molina, Los Angeles Times/Nov 4, 2012)


Youngest Holocaust survivors look to next generation

She was escaping Nazi Germany through the rescue mission Kindertransport, which carried about 10,000 youths to Britain for shelter during the Holocaust....

As they grew older, they sought out one another, drawn by a wrenching, shared experience. They founded the Kindertransport Association, and kinder from around the world have gathered every other year for the last two decades.

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