KINDERTRANSPORT IN THE NEWS (2016)

 

Nicholas Winton memorial service honours Holocaust hero

A memorial service has been held for Sir Nicholas Winton, who rescued hundreds of children from the Holocaust in the months before World War Two.

Some 28 of those he saved as children were among 400 people who attended the event at London's Guildhall, along with Czech, Slovak and UK government representatives.

Sir Nicholas organised the "Kindertransport" in which 669 mostly Jewish children came to Britain by train from Czechoslovakia in 1939.

He died on 1 July last year, aged 106.

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Former Child Refugees, Rescued From Nazis, Urge U.K. To Take Syrian Kids

In her suburban London row house, Margit Goodman, 94, sits wrapped in blankets in her favorite recliner. She was a girl of 17 when she first came to Britain, escaping from her native Prague just before the Germans invaded. She remembers the exact date: June 5, 1939.

The Goodmans and a number of former evacuees, are lobbying the U.K. to do the same for unaccompanied Syrian children who are in Europe.

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Alf Dubs: ‘Antisemitism, Islamophobia and racism are all equally abhorrent’

The peer who fled the Nazis, aged six, on Labour’s troubles – and his attempts to make the government accept 3,000 unaccompanied child refugees.

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Walter Kohn, Nobel Prize winner in chemistry, dies at 93

In the fall of 1939, Kohn left his native Vienna on one of the last transports of children to England, where he was interned as an “enemy alien.” The following year he was shipped to Canada, where he subsequently joined the Canadian army as an infantryman.

His parents, Salomon and Gittel Kohn, died in Auschwitz.

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'It was life and death for us and it's the same today'

With the government refusing to let 3,000 child refugees enter the UK, Guardian readers tell how they escaped the Holocaust – and why Britain must step up again.

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UC Santa Barbara physicist shared Nobel Prize in chemistry

A Holocaust survivor who became founding director of the Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics at UC Santa Barbara, Kohn helped make it possible to calculate more accurately how electrons flowed through materials. Decades later, scientists used his theories in computer modeling of complex molecules.

"Physics isn't what I do; it is what I am," Kohn once said.
He also had wide-ranging intellectual and humanitarian interests, and questioned where scientific advancement was taking the world.

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Walter Kohn, Nobel-Winning Scientist, Dies at 93

Walter Kohn, an Austrian-born American scientist and former refugee who shared a Nobel Prize in Chemistry—a subject that he had last formally studied in high school — died on last Tuesday in Santa Barbara, Calif. He was 93.

As a teenager, Dr. Kohn escaped to England from Nazi-occupied Vienna less than a month before World War II erupted, found himself shipped to Canada as an “enemy alien” and later built a long, distinguished academic career in the USA, becoming an American citizen in 1957.

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Walter Kohn, onetime refugee who became Nobel laureate in chemistry, dies.

Walter Kohn, whose parents saved his life by sending him out of Nazi-dominated Europe before the outbreak of World War II and who became a winner of the Nobel Prize in chemistry for work vital in developing new materials for electronics and medicine, died April 19.

The Nobel Prize — which he shared with mathematician and chemist John Pople — brought wide recognition. He told the Los Angeles Times that his contributions to science were his way of trying to help live his lost family’s lives.

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Kindertransport survivor to speak at Yom Hashoah observance in Florida

Each year the Holocaust Center provides a community program for Yom HaShoah, the Holocaust Day of Remembrance. This year's commemoration, scheduled for May 1 at 4 p.m., will be held in the gymnasium at The Roth Family Jewish Community Center, Maitland, Florida. There is no charge to attend, and reservations are not required.

For additional information about the program contact Terrance Hunter at 407-628-0555 x 225.

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Parliament

Parliament


Government Defeated Over Child Refugee Plan

The Government will have to take in 3,000 unaccompanied Syrian child refugees after Lords agreed a plan put forward by a Labour peer rescued from the Nazis nearly 80 years ago.

The House of Lords this afternoon backed an amendment from Alf Dubs calling on the Government to accept 3,000 unaccompanied child refugees who fled Syria and ended up in Europe.

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Geoffrey H. Hartman, Scholar Who Saw Literary Criticism as Art, Dies at 86

Geoffrey H. Hartman, a Kind from Frankfurt and a literary critic whose work took in the Romantic poets, Judaic sacred texts, Holocaust studies, deconstruction and the workings of memory — and took on the very function of criticism itself — died on March 14 at his home in Hamden, Conn. He was 86.

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Pianist’s appeals raise £18,000 for refugee hostel

Generous theatregoers have raised thousands of pounds for a homeless hostel after a direct appeal by musician and writer Mona Golabek to audiences at her one-woman show.

The money will go to the nearby Cardinal Hume Centre, which works with homeless young people and families with housing problems.

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Susie Lind speaking with Natasha Kaplinsky

Susie Lind speaking with Natasha Kaplinsky


After 77 years Kindertransport refugeespeaks of Sir Nicholas Winton

Susie Lind was one of 669 children rescued by the man dubbed the British Schindler – escaping on the penultimate train out of Czechoslovakia in May 1939. But the 91-year-old had not spoken in detail about her experiences for nearly eighty years, eventually doing so last year in response to a call from the UK Holocaust Memorial Foundation for survivors to record their testimony.

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Susie Lind talks about her rescue through the Kindertransport

Susie Lind, who was rescued from the Nazis by Sir Nicholas Winton’s Kindertransport, spoke about her experiences for the first time in almost 80 years. Ms Lind contributed to the BBC One documentary programme ‘Children Saved from the Nazis: The Story of Sir Nicholas Winton’. The programme celebrates the life and work of Sir Nicholas Winton on Holocaust Memorial Day in partnership with the UK Holocaust Memorial Foundation.

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JUAN CARLO/THE STAR Lina Edwards escaped Germany on the Kindertransport, the informal name given to a rescue effort that saved thousands of children

JUAN CARLO/THE STAR Lina Edwards escaped Germany on the Kindertransport, the informal name given to a rescue effort that saved thousands of children


Leisure Village resident remembers the train ride that saved her life

When Lina "Lee" Edwards was 15 years old, her tearful mother dropped her off at a train station, where mostly Jewish children like her were being whisked away from the Nazis and toward freedom. At the train station in Germany, Edwards' mother wiped her tears on a handkerchief, which she also used to hide a gift — a diamond and pearl jewelry piece.

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Award winning Pipeline theatre take Kindertransport play on UK tour

Following the success of their 2015 Edinburgh hit Spillikin, Cornwall’s Pipeline Theatre revives its debut play Transports for a national tour in Spring 2016.

The play – described by the Cornish Guardian as “brave, bold and brilliant” – tells the story of a volatile teenager who is shunted from one foster home to another in the 1970s, until she finds her new carer – an eccentric chatterbox, who keeps her Kindertransport past buried in a trunk.

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