KINDERTRANSPORT IN THE NEWS (2015)

 

CTV News program on Nicholas Winton

KTA member Alice Masters is interviewed. Watch online

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A family picture of Nicholas Winton with one of the hundreds of Jewish children whose lives he saved during World War II. Credit Press Association, via Associated Press

A family picture of Nicholas Winton with one of the hundreds of Jewish children whose lives he saved during World War II. Credit Press Association, via Associated Press


Nicholas Winton Is Dead at 106; Saved Children from the Holocaust

Nicholas Winton, a Briton who said nothing for a half-century about his role in organizing the escape of 669 mostly Jewish children from Czechoslovakia on the eve of World War II, a righteous deed like those of Oskar Schindler and Raoul Wallenberg, died on Wednesday in Maidenhead, England. He was 106.

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RIP Nicholas Winton, Who Saved Hundreds of Children from the Holocaust

Those who survived thanks to his efforts still refer to themselves as “Winton’s Children.”

“One saw the problem there, that a lot of these children were in danger, and you had to get them to what was called a safe haven, and there was no organization to do that. Why did I do it? Why do people do different things. Some people revel in taking risks, and some go through life taking no risks at all.”

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Nicholas Winton's children: The Czech Jews rescued by 'British Schindler'

Dubbed the "British Schindler", Sir Nicholas Winton rescued 669 children destined for Nazi concentration camps from Czechoslovakia as the outbreak of World War Two loomed.

His death at the age of 106 came on the same day 76 years ago when the train carrying the largest number of children - 241 - departed from Prague.

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Bill Graham’s history in rock ‘n’ roll, activism at Skirball

Bill Graham launched the psychedelic music era at the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco and the Fillmore East in New York, with bands such as The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin. Graham was a child of the Holocaust, and this exhibition brings that story to light.

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Inauguration of Kindertransport statue in Hamburg supported by UK refugees

The Association of Jewish Refugees represented Britain at last week’s inauguration of a Kindertransport statue in Hamburg, Germany.

Sir Erich Reich, Andrea Goodmaker and Carol Rossen from AJR were among the first to see the bronze sculpture, called The Last Farewell, by internationally acclaimed artist Frank Meisler, himself a Kind.

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The late Anne Forchheimer in 2008 with her daughter, Rachel Green. Photo courtesy of Rachel Green

The late Anne Forchheimer in 2008 with her daughter, Rachel Green. Photo courtesy of Rachel Green


‘The Last Girl at Victoria Station’ a Kindertransport story

Every morning in 1936, Anne Forchheimer would bicycle to school, over a bridge in the German town of Coburg. She tried not to notice the signs of hate she passed along the way. Hate for Jews and the call for their removal from German society. German law had forbidden Jewish students from attending public schools. Anne’s destination on this November morning, as it had been for the last 18 months, was a special school for Jewish children.

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Pupils get visit from children saved as part of Kindertransport

THE memories of children rescued from Nazi Germany and brought to Dovercourt more than 75 years ago have been shared with pupils.

Five of the children saved as part of Kindertransport have relived their experiences during a visit to Harwich and Dovercourt High School.

They were helping pupils with an Exits and Entrances project, in which the youngsters are examining the part played by the town in rescuing the children.

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Die Geschichtensammlerin

Article in the Suddeutsch Zeitung about young historian Lilly Maier and the research and writing she is doing on the Kindertransports.

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Memorabilia belonging to Inge Joseph on display at the Kindertransport museum in Vienna.. (photo credit:RONEN ZVULUN / REUTERS,RONI GORDON,ROOM NO. 4)

Memorabilia belonging to Inge Joseph on display at the Kindertransport museum in Vienna.. (photo credit:RONEN ZVULUN / REUTERS,RONI GORDON,ROOM NO. 4)


The Für Das Kind’ Kindertransport exhibition finds home in Vienna

After a decade traveling the world, the ‘Für Das Kind’ Kindertransport exhibition finds a permanent home in Vienna.

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KIndertransport Museum opens in Vienna

A Kindertransport Museum has recently opened in Vienna:

FÜR DAS KIND Memorial Museum, 1030 Vienna, Radetzkystraße 5/Pfefferhofgasse 5

“Für das Kind” is dedicated to all who helped ten thousand – mostly Jewish - children in Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia and Poland to escape and to survive the Nazi machinery of death between 1938 and 1939.

Visits must be arranged in advance.

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Kindertransport Reunion, London June 20-21, 1989

KTA member Olga Drucker writes about the very first Kindertransport Reunion:

"We came alone. We were as young as 4 months, as old as 17 years. Most were never to see their parents again. I was one of the luckier ones. After 6 years in England, I was reunited with my parents in New York.

In 1989, I attended the 50-year Reunion of Kindertransport (Children’s Transport)held in London, England. It was the brainchild of one woman, Bertha Leverton, herself a Kind from Munich...."

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